Rainbird asv inops.

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by jcom, May 9, 2007.

  1. jcom

    jcom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 791

    We have run into two customers with Rainbird 1" anti-siphon valves that were not blown out last fall. Now some of them are bypassing a small amount of water.

    Not being that familiar with these ASV valves, I am looking for some info. Are these valves when damaged able to allow small flows through them? Not either on or off. These are homeowner installed with new homeowners now that are completely in the dark as to sprinkler systems.

    Do you repair these valves or just throw them away? Easy to convert to regular valves with a PVB backflow.

    Thanks for the help.

    John
     

  2. By flow, I am assuming that you talking about water that is venting out of the outflow vent. If that is the case, the plunger\gate\hat\flapper what ever you wish to call it is not sealing properly. VERY simple fix, just replace that $2 part. At least in my local area, you can get repair kit\part at H.D. or Lowe's for R.B..

    Since the top part of vent is threaded, all you have to do is unscrew that part by hand and if needed with channel locks. Just don't try doing it from the top part of the vent as that part will snap off.
     
  3. bicmudpuppy

    bicmudpuppy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,781


    Easy to convert.......Yes. Economical to convert? I doubt it. How many valves are you having trouble with? one or two? five or six? Stop in and pick up two complete valves and see how many you can "fix" with the parts you net from those two valves. If you need more parts, now that you have a better understanding of how the work, either buy a few more whole vavles (I'm betting this is cheaper) or pick up only the parts you need. With whole valves, your probably going to net a solenoid you can't sell at this job, but it is inventory you should get back before the season is over. This makes buying the whole valve a much better deal for you. Charge the customer for parts. That is what they are getting. i.e. Valve costs $15. You charge customer(s) $10 for the diaphram, $18 for the solenoid, and $12 for the bonnet. You just made $25 for those parts vs $15 for selling them a new valve, and you didn't have to cut lose any plumbing.
     
  4. jcom

    jcom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 791

    The valves are leaking out to the heads. I have virtually no experience with these valves so will go pick a couple up
    and take them apart .

    Thanks for all the help.

    John
     
  5. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Are they manual or automatic ASVs?
     
  6. jcom

    jcom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 791

    RBird automatic valves.
     
  7. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    "Weeping" is a classic symptom of diaphraghm/diaphragm seat problems. Otherwords... the diaphragm may not be totally sealing off. Might be warped, cracked, debris, etc. It's like a leaking faucet. Changing the diaphragms will prolly stop the weeping. If it doesn't you may have a seating problem and it will depend if the diaphragm seat is replaceable. You might be money ahead to just change the whole valve out if you suspect any freezing damage.
     
  8. jcom

    jcom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 791

    This system was not winterized last year. Sorry about that omission as well.

    I had another repair job today that had two of the same valves doing the same thing. I will start stocking several of the repair kits for these valves.

    Thanks again,

    John
     
  9. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Just out of curiousity... in your cold climate area what type of piping are the ASVs installed onto?
     
  10. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,014

    Maybe better to just replace all the valves in one shot, based on T&M costs for messing around with freeze-damaged valves.
     

Share This Page