Re-seed after barricade

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by mosmgras, Mar 31, 2007.

  1. mosmgras

    mosmgras LawnSite Senior Member
    from NC
    Posts: 270

    First (most important) I am not licensed and did not apply this product.

    With that said...

    I have a customer that applied a barricade impregnated fertilizer two weeks ago (she says). I am not familiar with this product so I must ask, how long after application can I re-seed? My local southern states (supplier of the product) says wait two to three weeks. A friend (certified applicator) says I must wait longer. Any thoughts? Thanks guys.
     
  2. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,213

    Better wait about 6 weeks less if y'all got lots of rain--Better wait than sorry. Check out the label.
     
  3. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,213

    Just checked my label--4 months in the south between application and overseeding on LIQUID. That's sorta my standard rule. I like to apply in late winter and sow seed in late spring. About 4 months...Don't iknow anythng about it being impregnated with fertlizer--I'd let a pro take over. Might cost you a little but you'd have a lawn.
     
  4. mx495

    mx495 LawnSite Senior Member
    from MO
    Posts: 259

    I would assume that Barricade has similar waiting time as Dimension. Label for Dimension says 4 months.
     
  5. mayer

    mayer LawnSite Member
    Posts: 3

    Barricade is quite simply a pre-emergent herbicide that prohibits plant growth in treated areas. ie. Weeds or Grass etc. The length of residual of Barricade is directly related to the amount of A.I., Active Ingredient, applied per Acre. If applied at half rate your looking at a minimum of 2 months.

    Unfortunately in this situation the homeowner screwed himself and it is nothing but a waste of money to overseed for 3-4 months unless you consider deactivating the barricade with charcoal. Charcoal applications, unless sprayed are typically a messy endeavor since most of the well formulated granules are now off the market due to escalating production costs and limited use. In the end the labor in this situation out ways the results. Nothing to do really but just wait.

    This is a prime example of why a homeowner needs to use a qualified company to maintain his yard.:)
     
  6. mosmgras

    mosmgras LawnSite Senior Member
    from NC
    Posts: 270


    I agree...

    In January she calls and asks what she needs for her yard. I say soil test first, then recommended my friend who's a certified applicator. She says, great thanks... I'll give him a call. This week, she calls and says she's ready to start mowing. I say great... be there on Wednesday. I get there and she says she wants to re-seed, then follows up with, "I put some of that fertilizer stuff out a couple of weeks ago... you know, the kind with the weed killer in it." After some investigation, I discover that she's used barricade. ;)

    Hey, look on the bright side, now all I have to do is let her know that there will be no re-seeding until the fall.

    Oh yea, just in case I get flamed :realmad: a little, some may say that I'm not a "qualified" company - that is, I'm not a certified applicator (not yet, I'm scheduled to go for the school/test in May). This doesn't mean I'm not a professional company capable of offering and performing professional services. I do, however, realize my limitations. I am not certified or licensed to apply any type of pest/herbicide. That being the case, I do not. Every one of my customers that has inquired about these applications have been forwarded to someone trained and licensed. Hopefully, if all goes well, I won't have to do that after May of this year.

    Thanks for the responses guys. I'll call her and let her know that she is screwed... well, at least for now.
     
  7. mayer

    mayer LawnSite Member
    Posts: 3

    I didn't mean to imply any ill intentions with my use of "qualified" in my previous post. It was in no way meant to imply that you or your company is not qualified or professional but that homeowners need not bother delving into chemical applications when not trained.

    Sorry if it was taken in any other manner. Good Luck with your licensing.
     
  8. mosmgras

    mosmgras LawnSite Senior Member
    from NC
    Posts: 270

    No, no. Wasn't directed at you.

    I've been reading over posts in this forum for several months now in an attempt to prepare myself for certification. One thing that I have noticed is that anytime someone speaks of unlicensed application, there is a slew of reprimands issued. (most for good reason and in good faith.) I just wanted to make it clear that I wasn't tinkering around with chemicals that I didn't understand.

    Another thing that I noticed is that there are a few (very few) individuals here that feel only a licensed commercial applicator can provide proper lawn care. My previous post was directed at those who feel this way.

    I have numerous properties that are chemically maintained by a close friend. In the past year, he has grown beyond taking on my slack, hence, I am going to educate myself, seek certification and take over these applications.
     
  9. DUSTYCEDAR

    DUSTYCEDAR LawnSite Fanatic
    from PA
    Posts: 5,137

    good work on asking what she did and then finding out what she used and asking a good question.
     
  10. mayer

    mayer LawnSite Member
    Posts: 3

    Thanks for the heads-up. I just joined the site today and was unaware of the aggressive nature of the licensees! I will abide accordingly so as to not upset the system. I would also like to emphasize that I always obey the law and I have never made an off label application:) and I do hold a license.

    Again good luck!
     

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