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Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by whiffyspark, Jan 28, 2013.

  1. whiffyspark

    whiffyspark LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,087

    Does anyone have any good book recommendations?

    I took a job with a new company, would like to learn more in the off season
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  2. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,402

    Lawnsite.com. Being that I am The Hardscaper in Chief - Just follow my posts and threads and you'll know all there is to ever know
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  3. whiffyspark

    whiffyspark LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,087

    Well I've got a question.

    I've always believed in not setting pavers on concrete. I know one of the first jobs of the season is going to be a backyard renovation in st Mary's county. Is it acceptable to mortar pavers over concrete? They told me it will provide a base that won't move, but I'm worried about the concrete cracking eventually.
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  4. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,402

    "They"? Who's the "they"?? I'm presuming the homeowner?

    How old is the concrete?


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  5. clipfert

    clipfert LawnSite Member
    Posts: 195

    We only mortar copper pavers to prevent theft.


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  6. alldayrj

    alldayrj LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,747

    We sometimes set pavers on concrete around pools. But we always put an inch of sand too. No reason to mortar them down besides the border
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  7. whiffyspark

    whiffyspark LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,087

    The owner of the company actually said that. I'm not sure how old the concrete is.
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  8. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,402

    the purpose of interlocking pavers is that they CAN be set on a properly compacted aggregate base using the proper geo-textile fabric. Interlocking pavers are the 3rd oldest profession. This is what roads were built with at one time. And go to Eurpope and you'll see pavers everywhere you go.

    As long as the base is properly prepared/installed/compacted - the pavers will never move.

    The person that told you that is not properly apprised of pavers.

    Or, some people think it's a big expense to remove concrete - so they'll say they wanna veneer the slab, thinking they're saving dinero.

    The ground moves in the winter. Anything mortared to a slab on the ground is subject to freezing and popping loose.

    All these big mansions with elaborate brick porches and flagstone patios and pool decks - sooner or later they will have to have many of their brick / stone reset. It's just a matter of time before ice forms under the brick/stones, freezes, and pops.


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  9. whiffyspark

    whiffyspark LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,087

    The owners are against taking the concrete out because of pipes and electrical to the pool. This is a smaller company than I was working for before. I need the "experience" to get the mhic

    I really hope this doesn't come back to bite them, it's a 100k job. And they want to start working on it on February. Which I am against too

    If I was closer to you I would work for you lol
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  10. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,402

    Pipes and electrical to pools is usually not very deep, yet not very shallow either. Yet, you never know hoe deeo these things are. The supply pipes are PVC and are easily repaired if they were to be damaged. Electrical - the only electric running to the pool is the line for the light, usually in the deep end, and if there is a spa attached usually in the spa. And when the electric line is ran to the light in the deep end - it's usually pretty deep and often inside copper piping or plastic conduit. Depending on the pool's age.

    if it's that big of a job and they insist on mortaing - then they should consider natural stone. Or clay pavers.
     

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