Rebuild Retaining Wall

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by ozoneburner, Apr 9, 2014.

  1. ozoneburner

    ozoneburner LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    This is my 3rd year in the business, I have mainly confined myself to mowing, mulching, planting, cleanups... but I got a call today to rebuild a retaining wall. I tried to look up how much a wall like this would cost but everything I've found is about giant four foot plus walls and the one I'm rebuilding is less than 2 feet at its tallest point. So how would you experienced contractors price a rebuild like this? I know, figure out my costs and add how much profit I want to make, but other than fuel to get there and man labor, what other costs would I have? What other equipment would I need other than basic hand tools? How long would it take 2 or 3 guys? And how would one approximate a price? I really appreciate all of your guys advice.

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  2. ozoneburner

    ozoneburner LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    First picture is of a collapsed drainage area

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  3. alldayrj

    alldayrj LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,761

    Start with measuring it. That would be helpful
     
  4. ozoneburner

    ozoneburner LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    There are 3 half circles as seen in the pics
    1st one is 96 feet
    2nd one is 60 feet
    3rd one is 30 feet
    Add 16 feet for a smaller circle not seen in the pictures
    There's another 10 feet over top of the culvert
    Then there's the collapsed drainage one that's 5 feet by 2 feet
    None of the wall is over 1.5 feet tall
    Total of 209 feet long by vary heights from .5 to 1.5 feet tall
    This excludes drainage hole
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  5. TTS

    TTS LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 615

    Hard to see tiny pictures on my phone but what's all wrong with it? All I can see is it looks terribly built. Is it tipping over? Either way it doesn't seem like a good beginner project. Its usually harder to fix a wall than it is to build a new one.
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  6. ozoneburner

    ozoneburner LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    It's 12+ years old and and falling over in some areas and where it's upright the rocks sunk into the ground and are buried by dirt.
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  7. TTS

    TTS LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 615

    You will have to pull it all out and look at the base to see how bad they did with it. A proper base should go a long way towards fixing it. If theyre sinking and tipping the base is probably your answer. Also look at how they backfilled and check drainage behind the wall. Im guessing it has a crappy base and no backfill or drainage which caused the failure.

    Price is the cost of building a new wall plus time for taking out the old one.

    As far as other than hand tools I would look for a tiny tlb to rent. Everyone has their preference but I liked using them for walls when I did them. You can dig out to prep for the base then bring your base material in and use it for placing the stones.
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    Last edited: Apr 10, 2014
  8. TTS

    TTS LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 615

    Also see a few areas where you will need more stones to make it right.
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  9. ozoneburner

    ozoneburner LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    Being a mortarless wall, I thought drainage was the gaps between stones where the mortar would normally be allowed the water to seep through?
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  10. TTS

    TTS LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 615

    One of the more experienced guys can correct me if I'm wrong but drainage through the wall is a perk of mortarless construction but its not meant to be the only drainage. Especially with inadequate backfill. With little or no backfill the dirt/mud on the back of the wall fills the gaps and basically turns into its own mortar creating a solid wall with little to no flow through so all water pressure behind the wall pushes directly against it. With appropriate backfill the stones filter the dirt while allowing water to pass through. Still with heavy water runoff you can have issues trying to push that much water through the wall. I don't know where you're located but in my area this time of year is big for these issues. Theyre already a bit off from frost then as the snow rapidly melts mixed with a bit of rain they will tip right over.
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