Reclaimed Paver Question

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by sniggly, Dec 28, 2004.

  1. sniggly

    sniggly LawnSite Member
    Posts: 190

    Howdy All!....

    Got a question ferya. I recently was the beneficiary of about 1100 reclaimed pavers....absolutely free. They were transported in 10 yard dump trucks to a site where they were promptly sorted and stacked. From there I had to move what I wanted......1 by 1. No biggie.

    Anyway......the pavers look dirty (in a concrete glaze sorta way). Any Suggestions on how to clean them?

    Here is what I have. I calculated the Yield Factor so I could see what I had in square footage.

    Brick Size Total Factor Yield in Sqft

    6.25x9.25 196 0.4 78.4
    6.25x4.5 167 0.19 31.73
    6.25x6.25 506 0.27 136.62
    5.75x5.75 220 0.23 50.6
    4 sets
    pattern
    @ 22.5x22.5 4 3.5 14

    Total Sqft 311.35
    Subt 10% for cuts 280

    I am going to try and post a picture of them here so you can get a better idea of what they look like.

    Thanks in Advance!
    Chris
     
  2. sniggly

    sniggly LawnSite Member
    Posts: 190

    pics of the pavers

    image01.jpg

    image001.jpg

    image0001.jpg
     
  3. sniggly

    sniggly LawnSite Member
    Posts: 190

    I also am looking to do something like this with the pavers......tell me what you think.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. sniggly

    sniggly LawnSite Member
    Posts: 190

    Here is a more descriptive layout
     

    Attached Files:

  5. mbella

    mbella LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,284

    Chris, the whitish deposit on the pavers appears to be efflorescence. Efflorescence is common on pavers and other concrete products. Normally, it will weather and disappear over time. There are some products on the market which are supposed to help dissolve it, but I've never used one. Locally, Techni-Seal offers an efflorescence cleaner. Like I said I've never used it. One important note, if you manage to sell those pavers for one of your installs, don't seal the pavers until the efflorescence (if that's what it is) weathers.
     
  6. sniggly

    sniggly LawnSite Member
    Posts: 190

    ...I once used something from Home Depot called 'etching'. I was painting a concrete porch. Would that clean them up? BTW these babies are all mine......going in my back yard fersure.
     
  7. sniggly

    sniggly LawnSite Member
    Posts: 190

    I spoke with an paver installer in a very expensive neighborhood here in jax, and he said the only thing he puts down is 9-1-9 or 'screening' as some would call it. He doesn't put an inch of sand on top of the screening. Anyone got any opinions on this? We don't have the temp variations down here like you do up north so maybe that's it?
     
  8. mdb landscaping

    mdb landscaping LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,205

    well up here where we have a lot of frost, we base first with process and then add a few inches of stonedust on top to get the patio, walk etc level and pitched how we want. then we normally sweep with stonedust when done. on occasion we will use sand instead to sweep.
     
  9. mbella

    mbella LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,284

    Freeze/Thaw cycle concerns aside, I would still use sand and not screenings.
    Sand drains better and the pavers seat better in sand, giving you better interlock. Screenings do not drain properly and, over time, become soft.

    Specifically, you should use coarse concrete sand, which is also what ICPI recommends.
     
  10. mbella

    mbella LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,284

    In this post, I am specifically referring to the bedding that the paver are set in. While I don't use them, screenings are acceptable for the joints.
     

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