Red Thread

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by kris, Jul 28, 2001.

  1. kris

    kris LawnSite Bronze Member
    from nowhere
    Posts: 1,579

    I did a search and didn't get the answers I was looking for.

    What are the causes of Red Thread? Lack of N or to much watering?

    One post I searched was blaming the chem lawn company...any truth to that??
     
  2. CMerLand

    CMerLand LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 393

    kris,

    The disease triangle is the cause. Takes three things to have a disease,

    1. A susceptible host.
    2. The pathogen.
    3. Proper environmental conditions.

    Red thread will attack both low and high fertility lawns. Perennial rye and fescues are more susceptible then bluegrass. Periods of cool 75-85 degree temps with high humidity and overcast weather.

    Treatment depends on severity and customer concern for appearance. Fertilizing will help the turf outgrow the disease until weather conditions change provide you collect the clippings to reduce the amount of pathogen. Any of the contact and systemic fertilizers will control the problem but generally are very expensive. Avoid extending wet blade conditions by eliminating early evening/morning watering. Overnight watering is acceptable.
     
  3. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,555

    10 hours or more of wet grass,in combination with the above conditions ,and you will likely get red thread on Perrenial rye,I get it on my lawn at least once a year,in certain spots.
     
  4. kris

    kris LawnSite Bronze Member
    from nowhere
    Posts: 1,579

    Thank-you for your replys
     
  5. Kent Lawns

    Kent Lawns LawnSite Senior Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 870

    Bottom line: Fertilize.


    My input on previous posts:
    CMerland's response was very textbook in nature and was accutate (except the misquote "any of the contact or systemic FERTILIZERS will control the problem but generally are very expensive.") I assume it was supposed to say FUNGICIDES.

    Futhermore, why watering overnight would be acceptable, but early morning watering is not is a recommendation I am unfamiliar with.

    True, wet conditions spread the disease, but this disease is so simple to ID and control, I do not even consider it any real threat.

    Treatment can be done very simply: High amount of quick-release Nitrogen.
     
  6. CMerLand

    CMerLand LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 393

    Kent,

    You were right on my misquote. I did mean fungicide not fertilizer in that quote. Your question about early morning watering is regarding shortening the amount of time the grassblades are wet. Thats not always an option in the real world so early morning is far better then early evening as the morning watering will more quickly dry off of the turf blades.
     
  7. Kent Lawns

    Kent Lawns LawnSite Senior Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 870

    Agreed.
     
  8. kris

    kris LawnSite Bronze Member
    from nowhere
    Posts: 1,579

    again...thank-you
     

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