Redmax Reciprocator worth it?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing Equipment' started by cgrant711, Jun 15, 2014.

  1. cgrant711

    cgrant711 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 314

    Hey I've been wondering about the redmax reciprocator. I like that it doesn't throw stuff, because I have a few properties that need a lot of weedeating and I end up getting nailed with rocks and stickers.
    Do they hold up well? Are they're anything else that they can do to help pay for themselves? I saw somewhere that there is something similar to them, but I can't remember what it was.
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  2. agrostis

    agrostis LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,262

    For edging bermuda bunker's that's the greatest tool there is. For regular weedeating they might be to slow for you. Any woody growth will get stuck and make the blade's bind up. They seem pretty mechanically sound.
     
  3. mowandblow1980

    mowandblow1980 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 167

    Yeah I agree that they are slow for a lot of trimming. I've used mine for touch up edging for mulch jobs. You can bury the blade into soil. Its good if your using it around ponds and water areas. Not sure what the going price is. I have an ancient 4 cycle one.
     
  4. cgrant711

    cgrant711 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 314

    Ya, they look fairly slow, but I have a property were I'm weedeating hold pavement with pebbles everywhere and anytime I weedeat overgrowth areas my allergies get bad from all the stuff getting stirred up in the air. I also have some houses that get mulch thrown everywhere when I weedeat causing me extra time trying to blow it back into the beds after I already have gone over it with the lawn mower. Since it can edge beds and sidewalks, plus not throw stuff everywhere, I'll probably get it if I can find one. I still will favor the weedeater but it looks like it could easily pay for itself in a month.
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  5. 2 Cycle

    2 Cycle LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 581

    I am also looking at the maruyama blade as it apparently fits on a stihl Kombi. I would use it along white vinyl fences mostly but also to get in between trees and under bushes when I am pruning or mulching (sucker growth) rather than having to hand prune that stuff out. My main question is the blades themselves and how you can just bury it in soil. Doesn't it dull out instantly?
     
  6. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,938

    The Redmax can be used for vertical edging, Maruyama no. That is what a stick edger is for. Otherwise, I find the Landscape Blade great for trimming around plants hanging close to the ground. Try that with string and the plants will get caught in the spinning string. Around vinyl fences, chemical edging is best. Blades will cut into the plastic.
     
  7. 2 Cycle

    2 Cycle LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 581

    Oh ok that is news to me I thought the maruyama blade was essentially a clone of the reciprocator. If it can't really go in the dirt then I think I am all set. Thanks for the heads up
     
  8. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,938

    I know someone that used the Landscape Blade for vertical edging and he wasted a $100 set of blades in no time at all. Blades for a stick edger cost me $5-10 at most.
     
  9. RodneyK

    RodneyK LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 751

    Great for sod work. Replace string line trimmer not so much, it is hard to trim right up next to hard vertical surfaces. Touch up edging works ok. If you have three foot tall grass it works awesome or areas you don't want to throw everything everywhere. Works good cutting perennials back at end of season. Specialized tool, if you do a lot of different things it is worth it.
     
  10. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,938

    I use the Landscape Blade to match the fine cut from a reel mower. Against hard vertical surfaces, I cut a 1/4" gap with a stick edger and then finish cut with the landscape blade.
     

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