Regular Watering For Seed in the Fall

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Smallaxe, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. turfmd101

    turfmd101 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,278

    Only one way to water...as needed and when needed. There is no such thing as an irrigation schedule.
    Cloud cover, wind and temperature dictate transpiration. Since these conditions change on a daily basis. The only way to irrigate is when needed. Most all of the turf types we use are not aquatic plants. When non aquatic plants dry out. It is part of their natural process. Plants have a reserve of energy for drought situations. Once the soil becomes dry below the root system, enzymes from the foliage tell the root system to grow and look for water. When this reserve energy is used up is when drought sets in. I believe this to be healthy. Drought not drought dead. The more the shallowness of soil moisture the less the need for the turf do grow deep looking for it. The plant wants to live. It will take action to help insure when little water is available it can still survive. Foliage height will also dictate root development in terms of depth.
    The root system will not develop deep with short foliage to support but the taller the turf is allowed to grow the deeper the root system will develop to help support the mass of foliage now requiring food.
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  2. turfmd101

    turfmd101 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,278

    Only one way to water...as needed and when needed. There is no such thing as an irrigation schedule.
    Cloud cover, wind and temperature dictate transpiration. Since these conditions change on a daily basis. The only way to irrigate is when needed. Most all of the turf types we use are not aquatic plants. When non aquatic plants dry out. It is part of their natural process. Plants have a reserve of energy for drought situations. Once the soil becomes dry below the root system, enzymes from the foliage tell the root system to grow and look for water. When this reserve energy is used up is when drought sets in. I believe this to be healthy. Drought not drought dead. The more the shallowness of soil moisture the less the need for the turf do grow deep looking for it. The plant wants to live. It will take action to help insure when little water is available it can still survive. Foliage height will also dictate root development in terms of depth.
    The root system will not develop deep with short foliage to support but the taller the turf is allowed to grow, the deeper the root system will develop to help support the mass of foliage now requiring food. The higher its mowed or let to grow when possible combined with water applied properly will directly effect root development. Once the root system has matured is when harsh environmental conditions will have little ill effect on plant health. Also, only then will applications of proper nutrients be utilized to their full potential and be most effective.
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  3. turfmd101

    turfmd101 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,278

    Dam mobile device.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  4. Skipster

    Skipster LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,074

    Isn't it amazing how things change over time? 50 yrs ago, a car with an air conditioner and automatic transmission was top-of-the-line. Today, it's pretty much standard issue. Similarly, I think homeowner expectations for their lawn have changed.

    That change doesn't mean that lawns are "hooked" on our management. Proper management will help lawns get through stressful periods, not make them worse.

    If a managed lawn comes out of a stressful period looking worse than a non-managed lawn, it was mis-managed to begin with.
     
  5. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    I know there has to be some research that would analyse how the roots are given instructions to grow and that would be an interesting concept to learn about...

    One thing that is pretty sure, is that if a lawn is growing the 'living thatch' it is certainly being mis-managed... Living Thatch actually has roots growing in the wrong direction, so getting the roots to establish deep in the earth isn't even possible... that is just one example of 'life support' for lawns, that doesn't allow them to mature into independant healthy turf...
     

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