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remove green netting?

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by kalyeah, Dec 31, 2005.

  1. kalyeah

    kalyeah LawnSite Member
    Posts: 146

    I picked up a new customer near the end of the season. Her back yard has green netting layed down. I suppose this was for some kind of erosion control. I know the last company seeded last spring. Can't tell why any erosion control was needed. Lawn came in so so. Not great though. My question is.......do I just pull this netting up by hand? Covers the entire back lawn. Not very big area though. Maybe a 1000-1500 sq foot area. Thanks in advance.
  2. out4now

    out4now LawnSite Bronze Member
    from AZ
    Posts: 1,796

    By netting I'm wondering if you're refing to a weed mat? Did she just have a new lawn installed over one? How deep is the dirt over it? It may be there for a reason. The only time I have seen an entire yard done with it was for weed control in desert lawns. It may be a differnt material than what I am thinking of though. Can you post a close up pic of it?
  3. Pecker

    Pecker LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,454

    Definately ask the homeowner what the net is there for. Last thing you want is to be responsible for something like an erosion problem - which could get very expensive.
  4. captken

    captken LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,707

    I use that type matting in my work, brand name futura... It is used for erosion control, for seeding on a hill side. Holds everything in place. It is attached to the ground with staples. We also use it seeding because it retains water [like a sponge], the wood pulp [which is under the netting] soaks up water and triples in thickness and it doubles the seed germination rate because of the water retention, so we sometimes use it on flat ground.
    Leave it in place. It should be bio-degradable. Leave it alone and just mow over it.
  5. kalyeah

    kalyeah LawnSite Member
    Posts: 146

    Thanks, I thought that it might break down over time but wasn't sure. This is a very flat backyard. Any input why it would be used on a flat surface? I just can't see erosion being a problem.
  6. captken

    captken LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,707

    Glad to help.
  7. wherebluegrassgrows

    wherebluegrassgrows LawnSite Member
    Posts: 76

    Yeah sure it will breakdown I fought with this crap all over the ville last year. Trust me you'll want to get that stuff up before you start mowing it's not the easiest thing to remove from blade spindles. The only thing its good for is holding straw in place and I'd be willing to bet you can thank M.S.D. or someone who didn't know better for putting it there. And if M.S.D. is the culprit then you'll probably need to reseed in the spring anyway. They use some junk seed that makes pasture grass look like award winning turf.
    just my 2 cents
  8. Five Diamond Lawns

    Five Diamond Lawns LawnSite Member
    Posts: 197

    It was probably originally planted with sod. If so you won't get it up without pulling the entire lawn up.
  9. sheshovel

    sheshovel LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,112

    I agree with the above..sounds like sod netting
  10. fcl01

    fcl01 LawnSite Member
    from OHIO
    Posts: 249

    i've used erosion netting quite a bit for hillsides and such. it's usually pretty brittle by the time the lawn is ready to be mowed. if it was laid right, your blades should not even touch it. unless you're mowing real low. if you do catch some in the blades, it usually chops it up and spits it out. i've never had to unwind it off the spindles. not saying it dosnt happen but i've never had a problem.

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