Removing Grass and Creating New Beds

Discussion in 'Landscape Maintenance' started by GRT, Mar 3, 2009.

  1. GRT

    GRT LawnSite Member
    Posts: 116

    Please advise if you think this is a good practice to removing exisiting grass and creating new beds:

    1. Outline new bed area with spray paint - plan installation on paper
    2. Use roundup/grass killer to kill all grass within the painted outline. Wait for appropriate time for grass to die.
    3. Use sod cutter to remove old sod completely after grass is dead
    4. Till soil and add fert or top soil as applicable - compact with lawn roller
    5. Install new plantings as applicable.
    6. Mulch and Water

    Thanks for any advice.

    Geoff
     
  2. GracesLandscaping

    GracesLandscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 632

    dont sound bad to me... only you may not always ahve time to wait for the grass to die
     
  3. GRT

    GRT LawnSite Member
    Posts: 116

    Thanks. Just planning...
     
  4. T Money

    T Money LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    hey sounds good. Alot of work maybe once the grass and weeds are dead just till it all in. If not i would remove the grass before it dies. This way the grass will hold up better while you are cutting it out.
     
  5. LB1234

    LB1234 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,210

    Assuming you are licensed to spray, than ya go ahead. Not sure its necessary to spray AND rent a sod cutter. Why spray it if you are going to be removing it anyway? If ya spray it, just till it in after the applicable time for replanting according to the label.
     
  6. addictedtolandscaping

    addictedtolandscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    from NY
    Posts: 569

    Once you have your design, use a garden hose to lay it out on the ground
    Then take a can of line paint, mark your perimeter
    Use your sod cutter to cut your bed out
    Remove sod
    Till existing soil and amend as needed
    Install new plants
    Mulch to a depth of approximately 3"
     
  7. wmslc

    wmslc LawnSite Member
    Posts: 35

    I think that you have a great process, that is exactly what I would recommend! The only advice that I might be able to give is if the given landscape would need to be tilled...I would only do so if:

    1) The landscape needed some kind of amendment...ph OR renovation (only if the area needs to be killed AND removed)...most of which would depend on the plants that you would like to grow in that given piece of landscape any time in the near to distant future.

    2) I would also not use Glyphosphate AND use a Sod Cutter to remove any of the old turf...unless other circumstances required the use of both....again, depending on the plant that you wish to grow and if you would need to amend the soil.

    Other than those two reasons, I have not further recommedations for you.

    Good luck bidding, you seem to have a great understanding of the process of creating a new landscape bed!! Hopefully, other landscape contractors read this post and take everyones advice!!
     
  8. hackitdown

    hackitdown LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,501

    -I outline it with paint or a hose, and cut a deep, wide edge.
    -Then hit the grass inside the bed with round-up.
    -Wait at least 24 hrs for the roundup to be absorbed by the grass, it may not look dead yet, but it is doomed.
    -Remove grass, or till it in.
    -Install new plants.
    -Mulch.
     
  9. glfredrick

    glfredrick LawnSite Member
    Posts: 71

    If you have no plans to use seed, I'd also use an application of Ronstar under the mulch. It will control anything that emerges after installing the beds. It won't effect transplanted material.

    I'm with some of the other guys as well. No need to burn down the sod if you are going to cut it anyway. Just go to cutting, and use the sod somewhere else where it is needed.
     
  10. IntegrityGuy

    IntegrityGuy LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 781

    I would

    - outline
    - spray with weed killer.
    - till (skip the sod cutter)
    - edge
    - and mulch with atleast 4 inches thick.
     

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