Removing leaves

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by Miller Rules, Aug 11, 2005.

  1. Miller Rules

    Miller Rules LawnSite Member
    Posts: 66

    What do you Pros charge for removing leaves on a 100x150 size lot that have never been raked before?
     
  2. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    No way of saying without kniowing how much material is going out. This doesn't mean saying 10 to 12 trees, either. You have to kind of know how much you're hauling. That is what determines how much has to be pushed, picked up, and even the amount dumped affects the price.
     
  3. jim dailey

    jim dailey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 614

    OK, that is just about the size of a football field. I don't think that Florida has any real BIG leaves, unlike the ones we have up here. I would first walk the property and check for large trash items. Then, depending on your equipment, I would mow it a couple of times, different directions each time. Then put the bagger on and pick it all up. If needed, to top it off, just run a push blower or large backpack blower over it. You have to have a business plan to know what you have to charge per hour/job according to what equipment you have and are using for the particular job. If you don't, charge per hour according to what your local market will bear. Learn from that experience to form the basis as to what your business needs to charge to survive, in your locality. What the "PRO'S" charge is irrelevant to you at this time. They have a different situation that determines their rate. It is not the same as your's. Sit down, figure it out and that is what you need to charge. If it doesn't go, move on to the next job, until you find your niche. Let us know how you make out.
     
  4. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    LOL! :D You guys sure have some small football field up around that way! Ours are 100 yds. by about 80 yds. across! :rolleyes:
     
  5. John Gamba

    John Gamba LawnSite Fanatic
    from ct
    Posts: 10,812

    I think he meant Feet not yards.
    John
     
  6. jim dailey

    jim dailey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 614

    Thank you John. It seems that no matter what is said on here, picking it apart is the first step. SORRY, a mistake was made. The question concerns the pricing. I simply tried to help him, in steering him in a direction that he would be able to figure his cost. Next time I will bring my tape measure.
     
  7. John Gamba

    John Gamba LawnSite Fanatic
    from ct
    Posts: 10,812

    No big deal.

    John
     
  8. SHOWCASE LAWNS LLC

    SHOWCASE LAWNS LLC LawnSite Member
    Posts: 238

    Every Area Has Its Own General Price Structure And Within That You Get The Lowballers And Also The High End Pros.....almost None Will Bid Exactly The Same. Get A Few Estimates , Check For Current Insurance And Workers Comp Talk To The Guy In Person, Get Everything On Paper . Then And Only Then Can You Truly Start To Tell Which Is A Fair Price. Even Then There Is Probably Going To Be A Wide Range Of Pricing.
     
  9. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    I'm sorry,...I was only having a little fun. I'm trying to make the best out of this thing....I6t's just been a rough time lately with the anniversary of my dad's passing.
    Anyway, if you do a proper search, you will turn up tons of info on fall cleanup pricing. I know, because I have posted alot myself.
    The things you have to figure are these. Access, time, and ability.
    Access...Getting to the leaves and how open is it to move them. In other words, do you have any gates? Enclosures? Hills? Breakwalls and/or step surfaces?
    Second is time. How long is it going to take you to complete this, using the machinery you have. This step takes practice and experience. After awhile, you learn what it takes to move X amount of leaves and load them. This can be small sections, and then you just add the sections up.
    Last, is ability. WHAT do YOU have to move and load these leaves. You will learn what pieces of equipment work better in different situations and areas. Along with this, you learn the equipments limitations, so you can delegate what power is used and to what extent. For instance, ever see the little old man in his driveway trying to move a 3 ft. tall pile of leaves with his little electric blower? It may take him 5 minutes to get that pile across his drive, but by golly, he'll "get 'er done". Now, he could've grabbed a rake, and swept them across his driveway in a matter of 30 seconds, but it's just not the same. Well, the same thing can happen to lco's, and does. They end up thumjacking a pile of leaves trying to push the row, when they COULD just round that pile up and start a new row, - covering 5 times the area in the same amount of time. I've seen it a hundred times.
    Anyway, in time, you will be able to go into an area, scope it out (fences, pits, hills, etc., and look up into the trees and know what it's going to take to clean the place up. I hope this helps.
     

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