removing spots of broadleaf and fertilizing early july in NC?

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by JBradshaw00, Jul 6, 2013.

  1. tattooedturf

    tattooedturf LawnSite Member
    Posts: 39

    one more thing, it doesn't matter where it's bought from, you have to be licensed to apply ANY herbicide, pesticide or fungicide on anyone else's property in N.C. I know a lot of people do it, but... just sayin'
     
  2. turfmd101

    turfmd101 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,270

    Just clarifying. PESTICIDES are ( insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, termiticides, nemiticides etc.)
     
  3. Victorsaur

    Victorsaur LawnSite Member
    Posts: 81

    These were my first immediate thoughts when he told me that over the phone. I asked him what if the fertilizer didn't include nitrogen and he repeated ANY fertilizer. I know some people around here in NC can be hasty when making judgement calls, perhaps this is the case, but I'm not sure. Phosphorous moves so slowly through the soil that I doubt it would have a chance to burn roots like how Nitrogen does. I'm learning this stuff still myself so I appreciate any information.
     
  4. turfmd101

    turfmd101 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,270

    Diammonium phosphate will be readily available to start repairing the root tissue and start building root structure. If the root system can repair. The plant has the likelihood of survival recovery. It will just need the nutrient nature designed for it.
     
  5. ted putnam

    ted putnam LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,530

    All nutrient, weed control and fungicide recommendations you receive from here aside. Your customer needs someone who is licensed and professional to take care of his lawn when it comes to applications. It will protect you and him. He doesn't want anything else bad to happen to his landscape and you don't want to be involved in a lawsuit without proper credentials. If he doesn't want to get mixed up with a national company, then don't. Get a locally owned and operated company that gives personal attention and quality service. That could be you some day but you need to learn more(you can do some of that here) and take the test and get your license so if something bad were to happen, you'd at least have a leg to stand on.
     
  6. turfmd101

    turfmd101 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,270

    Ted rang in the most sensible aspect of correcting your issue.
     
  7. Victorsaur

    Victorsaur LawnSite Member
    Posts: 81

    Yeah DAP is the standard phosphate fertilizer... Apparently it is the salts in fertilizer that can cause burn to the roots. I'm wondering if something like rock phosphate would be an applicable fertilizer in Summer for tall fescue given that A) it moves through the soil so slowly and B) it is an organic source of fertilizer.
     
  8. turfmd101

    turfmd101 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,270

    My guess would be that 1/2 rates or 1/3 rates at 20 day intervals would be safe. But tall fescue is not my specialty. I don't want to ill advise. Feedback is absorbed.
     
  9. wildstarblazer

    wildstarblazer LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 978

    Just let it dry out from all the rain and keep cutting at the right height and intervals and it will recover on it's own.
     
  10. Victorsaur

    Victorsaur LawnSite Member
    Posts: 81

    On another note for the original poster, I have to second what tattooedturf said about it being brown patch fungus, that's what it looks like to me, and you can be sure of it if there were extended wet periods on the turf. This is the turf disease that tall fescue it notably susceptible to.
     

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