Residental Lighting

Discussion in 'Landscape Lighting' started by justinL110, Nov 3, 2007.

  1. justinL110

    justinL110 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 18

    Recently I had a customer ask me to install a lighting system that would appeal to her house and completley light up her brick on the house. She also wanted it in the front flowerbed. I need some help on the design of the lights that shine on the brick. I also need product advise and where to buy. Thanks guys.
     
  2. pete scalia

    pete scalia LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    My advise is this. Find a specialist in your area and subcontract him to do this job for you this time. You can still make some money but more importantly the customer is happy and not mad at you because you have never done this before and will be experimenting on their property. If you are truly interested in doing lighting in the future then buy some lights and experiment on a safe house like your own or a family member. Then and only then after you have some feel for this should you contract a job with anyone. You may not like my answer but this is the best for everyone concerned. Good luck.
     
  3. justinL110

    justinL110 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 18

    I am not worried about the customer becoming angry with me about experimenting on their property. I know them very well and they are aware that this is the first time I have dealt with this type of lighting. If I never do one myself how am I suppose to learn. My question is where do I go about finding a place to buy the materials and some advise on install.
     
  4. YardPro

    YardPro LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,564

    contact a distributer like john deere landscapes and ask when they are putting on classes for lighting..
     
  5. Pro-Scapes

    Pro-Scapes LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,181

    I gotta agree with calling in a sub for this job. Learn from the job... watch.. ask to be part of the experience and learn. Dont ask questions to the annoying point but I for one would not shy away from educating someone who wants to learn to do it right.

    Without a good amount of training, Reasearch and hands on experience It would be an injustice to you and your client. If you take the time to learn it from a seasoned lighting installer the client will be more likley to reffer you for other work and you can either continue to get a piece of it from the sub or take what you have learned and move forward with it.

    On another note you may actually make more on the job subbing it out that you could doing it yourself. Dont discredit subcontracting. It can be just as profitable because the specialist can obtain a higher price.... they can provide superior design and knowledge and you wont be creating a liability by performing something that is not safe.
     
  6. irrig8r

    irrig8r LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,533

    Well said Billy. And Pete.
     
  7. David Gretzmier

    David Gretzmier LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,645

    learning from a pro is always quicker than discovering on your own. you know the job is done right, and they will point out, fix your mistakes. without a pro, you are relying on yourself to fix yourself. I would not tear into a customers engine just to learn how to be a mechanic, even if I had a book and the customer said go for it.
     
  8. Pro-Scapes

    Pro-Scapes LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,181

    Another point to consider... are you INSURED for lighting ? Chances are prolly not. I would suggest carrying min 1 million... we carry 2 million just to be safe and to protect us.
     
  9. niteliters

    niteliters LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 537

    who you choose to learn from will set you on a path. not always the correct path. I am 4 hours away and would be willing to talk with you. pm me with your contact info if you would like.
     
  10. INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting

    INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,102

    I am also insured with an industry specific policy. We just recently upped our coverage from 2 milllion to 5 million after a long disagreement with our underwriter.

    Most of the homes and properties we work on are worth 2 million+. I wasn't very happy carrying minimal insurance, and the underwriters were a little confused as to just what type of properties we were working on.

    After watching a couple of friends suffer a catastrophic business loss due to improper insurance, I would encourage all of you to closely examine your coverage and also to have an indepth consultation with your broker/underwriter. This will ensure that the insurance company clearly understands your business and that you are properly covered. Settling for a general business liability policy could leave you unknowingly exposed.
     

Share This Page