Retaining Wall question?

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Dig-it Landscaping, Nov 15, 2004.

  1. Dig-it Landscaping

    Dig-it Landscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 108

    I have an elderly customer who cannot bend over much at all due to heart problems. during our first meeting she pointed to the neighbors house which had a raised bed about 3 feet up made of concrete with a design in it. she said she wanted a bed like that but she "wanted it prettier" she said later she wanted it in wall stone. it is a small 1 story house and i wouldn't recommend it in the front due to the height it would have. My main question is if i put this wall in will it hurt the house due to the dirt running up on the brick siding. is there anything that i am overlooking or any other suggestions. please keep in mind i normally wouldn't install something like this but it is functional for her since she wants to take care of the beds a little herself to relax. any suggestions are welcome.

    bachea.JPG
     
  2. Dig-it Landscaping

    Dig-it Landscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 108

    i know this doesn't look the best but it is the best i could do for a straight on view i hope you get the idea. here is a before pic.

    bachea 1.jpg
     
  3. Dig-it Landscaping

    Dig-it Landscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 108

    the two smaller walls were put in to hopefully soften up the looks of the height of the tall wall. they are connected into the bottom layers of the main wall.
     
  4. NNJLandman

    NNJLandman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,306

    Well you could always put some weed mat fabric up against the house and then let the dirt hold it up but i don't think the dirt would do much damage to the brick work. Heavy rain may splatter the dirt onto the window and the house which is something to think about but im sure power washing could take care of all that. Good Luck.

    Jeff
     
  5. TURF BUDDY

    TURF BUDDY LawnSite Member
    Posts: 20

    Dig-it... That flower bed would probally hold moisture along the wall unless you could put in a ft or two of gravel with a drain pipe. I did notice in the picture that the house does have a gutter, that will help. but I wouldn't recommend that high of a wall. I had a similar case which I was able to talk the home owner into something different.I dont know if it can be done but could that wall be sealed with something to keep water out. I think the wall looks attractive but the risk out weighs the beauty. I hope I was of some help.
     
  6. JRSlawn

    JRSlawn LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 637

    Dig it I also agree with turf body the moisture is going to be a probablem. Older ladies tend to not understand. I would call up a foundation company and see if they could spray it with a moisture barrier we have a company called foundation systems here and they do water proofing. Does the old lady know the cost of this. A wall of that nature with the extra services that are required can become very expensive make sure you cover these expenses.

    Good Luck
     
  7. TURF BUDDY

    TURF BUDDY LawnSite Member
    Posts: 20

    This Is A Common Problem Anyone Have A Good Solution To This Problem. I See This Done All The Time, The Retaining Wall Higher Than The Brick On The Home, But, Am Concerned About The Possibilities Of Water Damage, Glad You Brought This Up dig
     
  8. Longstar

    Longstar LawnSite Member
    Posts: 62

    This would never pass a home inspection when or if the home gets sold. There are weep holes at the bottom of the brick line to release moisture build up from within the wall. If you put dirt and organic material there, you are asking for a huge problem. Never have your beds higher than the brick line. This could cause termite infestation and more than likely ant problems down the rode.
     
  9. activelandscaping

    activelandscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 241

    They make a " moisture proof barrier " . It's a non-woven fabric that should be used whenever Any soil/sand meets an existing concrete structure. This is also used, or should be, when porches, patios, etc..... are placed against a residential structure ( given that they require backfill ). I will post a link, I am in a bit of a rush now. You should be able to get it from any geo-fabric supplier.

    Regards,
    Active
     
  10. activelandscaping

    activelandscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 241

    The following link provides a number of suitable products. Personally I prefer the " panel type " barriers, unless it's a large job they tend to be easier to use.

    Link: Thermal and Moisture Protection


    Regards,
    Active
     

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