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Retiree looking for advice.......!

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by jet3099, Sep 24, 2006.

  1. jet3099

    jet3099 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 1

    I am about to retire this coming spring. I have been a turf care (schools, golf courses) person for about 25 yrs. on a part time basis. When I retire from being a H.S. principal, what kind of income can I expect to make working 3-4 days wk in the Nashville, TN area? I already have a truck, trailer, mower (JD 757 Z-Trak), blower, hedge trimmer, and Stihl FS80 trimmer........... Any and all advice will be greatly appreciated!

    PMLAWN LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,535

    $23,568.92--give or take,:)

    What do you want to do. how many yards will you cut a day, What does that area pay to cut a yard, what will be your overhead. Will you pay taxes and insurance or "fly under the radar":nono: , Do you plan on using up your equipment and than getting out or making enough to replace when needed.
    Will you do all your own equipment maintenance or pay to have it done???
    Did you do a business plan to figure your costs of doing business.
    It can be a good retirement job but it is hard, Hot work, will you work all day?
    Good luck with it and thanks for being an educator
  3. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    Yeah, I mean... It doesn't work exactly like a 9-5 job heheh...
    Hence I agree, you need a plan.

    Either way, I can tell you one thing: Act like you'll be doing this full-time and put out a TON of advertising, because during my first year I only grossed 10k and if you find that is enough then so be it, but what I'm saying is the first year will be slow anyhow so my advice is don't start at half tempo, don't have this attitude of 'i kinda think i wanna...' Either you do, or you don't.

    Going into business isn't like the first dive into a pool of water where you first stick your foot in to test the temperature... If you do this in business, I can almost guarantee failure - Dive right in and get it over with, it really is the best (and I think only) way. Trust me, if things get too busy to your liking all you need to do is raise your prices by a measly 5 bucks, and I can almost guarantee this will not be a problem thou I do wish you the best of luck.

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