Root problem

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by scottt, Jun 9, 2001.

  1. scottt

    scottt LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 269

    One of my customer's neighbors has a tree just on the other side of their fence. The roots have gone under the fence and are beginning to surface in my customer's yard. It is keeping the grass from filling in and she is worried about the roots getting into her foundation. Is there anything I can do to keep the roots on the other side of the fence?
     
  2. greens1

    greens1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    It really depends on the size of the tree and how much she wants to remain friends with her neighbor.

    All the solutions, if you want to call them that, require severing the root system and thereby damaging the tree in the worst possible way.

    Jim L
     
  3. scottt

    scottt LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 269

    So all I can do is cut the roots. Is there anything I can do to keep them from coming back across the fence?
     
  4. paul

    paul Lawnsite Addict
    Posts: 1,625

    Sure but you'll have to install a fabric in the trench, trench about 3' deep and install a heavy road fabric two layers should do it. As for the tree living after that I won't say.
     
  5. lawnboykb

    lawnboykb LawnSite Member
    Posts: 51

    paul has it right on......but no it won't kill the tree....just do it in the spring or fall not during the middle of summer. And if you want to be safe just stay on the outside of the trees drip line when you trench. By the way this will not last for ever, over time the tree will come back over. But it takes years and years. We do it all the time on the golf course. Trees love to send roots to the greens
     
  6. greens1

    greens1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    Actually there are two products, that I know of, which are specifically designed to prevent roots from penetrating them. One is liniar root barrier made by Deeproot. The other is Biobarrier, a chemical impregnated fabric which prevents cell division at the root tip. The chemical, Trifluralin, is nonmobile and nonsystemic.

    If you have to prune the roots then I would wait untill early September and use Transplant packs in the trench, if possible.

    Jim L
     
  7. scottt

    scottt LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 269

    Thanks for all the replies. I talked to the customer today and she would be happy if the tree died. I'm wondering though if I could be held liable for killing it. I wouldn't think so since the trench is on my customer's side, but I don't want any problems. Also, since I have never done anything like this before I need an idea of how long it will take. I have to give an estimate in the next couple of days.
     
  8. lawnboykb

    lawnboykb LawnSite Member
    Posts: 51

    This is an easy one if you think about it.....are you trying to kill the tree? Or are you trying to correct a problem with the health of the tree in mind? Such as trenching at the drip line of the tree?
    Some of the last ones that I did were over ten years ago.
    In the end if you try and do the job with as little damage to the tree as you can...then I would say no. Remember she has a right to take anything out of her yard that she wants to.
     
  9. Ron Persaud

    Ron Persaud LawnSite Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 17

    I would be extremely careful with this because it can upset the stability of the whole tree and cause it to crash in high wind or flood conditions.
     

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