RWF, Inc.

Discussion in 'Original Pictures Forum' started by tthomass, Aug 27, 2007.

  1. mrusk

    mrusk LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,260

    That retaining wall would NEVER past an inspection in NJ.
     
  2. Junior M

    Junior M LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,544

    Oh okay.

    And I understand you use it, its like a work truck, just cause its a work truck doesnt mean you cant take care of it, but I definetly get what your saying, there are times when you got better things to do than worry about beating up your machine.. :waving:
     
  3. Hollowellreid

    Hollowellreid LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 290

    So how does the footing work? Is the grade high enough that the bottom of the concrete should be under the frost line? Here the footing (at least if you get any sort of permit) needs to be 42" deep. You guys need a Kushlan mixer! really nice for small amounts of mortar, concrete, etc.

    Another question to follow up on another earlier one...when you do bluestone/flagstone and wet set it, do you pour a standard 4" slab and then scratch/mortar bed then set the stone into that? Or?

    Thanks in advance
     
  4. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,497

    Welcome to VA.
     
  5. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,497

    The footing is actually close to 30", 24" is code here in VA (we're warmer). Additionally, grade is raising on the outside of the wall as I excavated a flat area with the Bobcat so that I could operate the excavator on a level surface to dig the footer.

    Kushlan a brand? I have a mixer but we use it for concrete, not mortar as it makes a mess.

    4" is standard, my minimum. I pour 5-6" and then tamp with a hard rake to roughen the surface. Mortar then is used to set each stone, one by one.
     
  6. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,497

    Wall will be getting 12" of #57 gravel up the back + 2" weep holes/drainage coming through the wall. Wall will be filled solid with concrete too. No inspections required on a wall of this size.
     
  7. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,497

    -Hey Matt.......what is NJ code anyway? At what height does it kick in, specs etc?.....generally speaking
     
  8. mrusk

    mrusk LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,260

    I have a engineered plan right in front of me. Any cmu wall needs to be engineered if its not like a seat wall or something with no load.

    This is a 3ft tall wall with a average load behind it. Frost line is 42" We need a T footing bottom of T is 16" wide top of the t is 4'9" wide. T has a total height of 3'. T has #5 rebar running vert @ 32" on c and #4 running hort at 10" on center. Once the t footing is poured we would start the the 10" cmu's. We need to have 2' of cmu's burried below grade. Then we would have our 3' of wall above grade. The cmus need durawall every other course and the wall has to be grouted solid.

    This is a pretty standard plan I just snapped a pic of the plan to help you.

    wallplanmasonry 002 [%P].JPG
     
  9. P.Services

    P.Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,322


    how much is the stone? are you buying it quarry direct or are you getting it from a landscape supply center?

    can you snap some pics of the pallets before you start to use them? how many sq ft of coverage do you get per ton or per pallet?
     
  10. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,497

    Its about $225 for a pallet from supply center. Its the same thin stone that is often used to build dry stack walls. Nothing special but it works in a pinch when you need to trim some fat to close a deal. When it comes down to having to use PA, I'm looking at a speed factor. Fit it a little and throw the mortar to it. You trim the "fat" and meet a budget by saving on material and labor. On this wall here, I would have probably just recommended the PA anyway because they do not use the lower yard at all making, for example, a $600 per ton stone a waste of money. Now, if they like the more expensive stone and want it, thats fine with me but its just a matter of talking to the customer, getting a budget and knowing what they'll go for.

    I've got a 'dove gray' wall coming up in a few weeks which looks much nicer. Its not a big job but a much nicer look as the other tends to look cookie cutter. A few pages back with the picture of the circle landing + brick has a 'dove gray' wall. We're building one wrapping the left side of the house + lighting.
     

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