Safety Spotlight - Assisting Lean With Wedges

Discussion in 'Tree Service Safety' started by Guest, Sep 4, 2008.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    Here is a very good article from a recent issue of Tree Services Magazine, written by Michael Tain....

    Unlike their peers in the logging industry, who typically work in rural, isolated locations with few objects that can be broken or destroyed other than themselves or other trees; tree care professionals working in urban and suburban settings tend to conduct their work in a “target-rich environment,” surrounded by man-made objects and structures that....

    To read the entire article go to the link below....

    http://www.treeservicesmagazine.com/article.php?id=2008
     
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    wedges are nice but in the cityythey are most useful for stumps and not pnchhing when felling a nice size tree.winchs- ropes and come alongs are the best in the city.
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    Wedges do help, however if you want to do it right and not worry about a gust of wind, use a winch or a come-along…..depending on the lean and size of tree.
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    I like to use my GRCS. Mount it on a tree. Wrap it crank it. Cut it. TIMBER. trying to locate pics of this.
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    I dont know exactly how long the strap is. But I did have it around a 5 ft stem. And had lots left. LOTS. Its gotta be 25+ft.
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    Sorry Diameter. I wish I had pic of it, but I started brushing the tree out by myself on a day off and the next day I had help for the rigging and just wanted to get it done. Wound up with 4 loads (6.5 yrds each) of would chips and 14 loads of wood. Took all week (after work)
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    Yea the tree was 75-80 feet tall. And 120+/- across. It was large. The truck and chipper pic was at the oak removal with the crane though. We cut the wood to 20-30 inch rounds and then if my tractor wouldnt pick that up we ripped the rounds in half and loaded them on the truck. I did have to cut the bottom round in quarters. No fire wood, Norway maple is too difficult to split and it doesnt burn that well. A lot of wood into a lot of mulch. I dump all my material on site of my full time job. They hire in a tub grinder twice a year and make TONS of mulch that they use with in the gardens.
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    Mike,
    Not prying. My situation is sort of complicated to many tree care pros. I get wierd looks all the time when I say that I work full time as an arborist and have my own tree care buis on the side.
    I work for a horticultural display garden. They have over 1000 acers of land and 300 of it is open to the public. We have a 4 (soon to be 5) man crew (all certified) that takes care of the trees on the grounds. Over the years the quality and quatity of work getting done around the gardens was falling off. Now we are starting to get back to taking care of the trees so that they dont fall apart with ice and snow. Also we are responsible for a spectacular christmas display. the christmas display takes 4-5 months and the rest of the time we work on caring for the trees and of course "putting out the fires" if you know what I mean.
    Hopefully this helps you understand. If not PM me and I will shed further light. Thanks
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    Found in industry mag. Had been here once before and wondered who did the work. Now I know. To land the job I only had to beat out 3 others. I have met all three of the other guys since. (One couldnt pass the drug test, one is working there in another position (not much experience), and the other I dont know why they didnt take him).

    I would like to keep things the way they are for now. I make enough to keep me busy. Someday I would like to get a crew that I can trust, line up the work and let them do it (and of course reep the benifits). But if not it would be a great retirement plan.
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    Yes The benifits are great. But also the learning ops that a company this size can offer is unbelieveable. We spent 6 days with Dr. Ed Gillman from fla state, in the last 3 years. Talking about Structural/developmental pruning. The things we learned were things that you never would have thought you could do. Makes you think outside the box on your pruning. And think about what the tree will look like when it is mature. Not what it looks like now, and how to explain that it might not look great now but in a couple years it will.
    Last fall we spent 3 days with Scott Prophet, training on Airial rescue. More that just going up and getting someone. On spike rescues, static line rescue and dynamic rescue. Actually doing these rescues make you really think about how you climb and your set ups. Makes you think, "if I use this how is someone going to get me down if I get hurt".
    And this Feb we will be spending 3 days With Scott on Crane Assisted Technical Rigging.

    And finally the guys I work with are great. We all look around and try new things. When something works for us we share it with the rest of the crew. When something doesnt work we share, and learn and try to make it work together.
     

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