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Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by wiggins, Dec 12, 2006.

  1. wiggins

    wiggins LawnSite Member
    Posts: 6

    Hey everyone, I'm getting a head start on my commercial sales this month through February, just wanted to know if you guys with many years of experience have any advice for a beginner, what questions to ask, how to approach, how to close, etc. any advice will help.

    Also in March i'm starting my door to door campaign for residential. Any advice on that? especially how do I find the right areas to explore?
  2. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    I wouldn't fool with commercial accounts for at least 4 years.
    And I wouldn't fool with employees for at least the first 2 years.

    Go solo residential only, for a long time, this will help ensure your ship is watertight.
  3. Tn Lawn Man

    Tn Lawn Man LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 479

    Sound advice. Very sound
  4. Tim Wright

    Tim Wright LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,034

    I would ammend what has been said to reflect this.

    Do as much as you can handle by yourself first. Push yourself to handle more than you think you can.

    Use the time and experience to get a (your) system down patt so that you can teach someone else the same system (the key is duplication + volume), get yourself organized, etc, then go all out.

    When I say system I mean how you run your office, and field. That way when you are done teaching your first employees, then they can teach the next set and so on. Get your SOP written, your safety rules, handbooks, whatever you feel will add to and yet simplify, and clarify your business as a system.

    If you are great at running things, perhaps you can ration out what you are going after. For instance:

    This year 20-30 residential, 2 retail, 2 apartment complexes, and what ever else you can handle. Use this mix to determine next year's target goals and market mix, as well as equipment needed and the number and type of employees.

    Hopefully those thoughts where not too scrambled.

  5. wiggins

    wiggins LawnSite Member
    Posts: 6

    thats the thing i've been in business for three years and i have over ten years experience. I'm at the point in my business that i am ready to hire employees and I am ready to tackle more commercial accounts and residential accounts. I was just wondering if there were some helpfull hints or tactics to use to get those accounts, where to find residential areas that are more prone to buy services, etc.
  6. Tim Wright

    Tim Wright LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,034

    Well, as far as experience you may very well be more ready than I am for going whole hog.

    But it is in my goals to build my business into a business. So that is exactly what I am doing.

    As for tactics, I really do not have any, except to go into middle class sub divisions that you want to work in, that is spend a day or two in and hang a boat load of door hangers.

    This year I went from a one man band mowing "When Needed" to setting in place a system. I am still working on it.

    What did I do to retain my current customers and build on that base?

    You can read about it in the following post.


    Right now I am making my rounds to the local apartment complexes, to see what they are doing for the next year, and when they will be taking new bids.


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