salt as an herbicide?

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by TClawn, Nov 15, 2004.

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  1. TClawn

    TClawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,036

    I am trying to kill killinga in my lawn with salt. I have had limited success with it but have not totally killed off the plant. it seems to set it back but does not kill it completely.

    I have used salt, with no ill effect, on seashore paspalum for clover and other weeds that are not conducive to pulling, but due to the succulent nature of the killinga I think that it will take a mega dose of salt to kill it. I'm afraid that I will permanently destroy the soil by using such a large dose salt on the area.

    is there any way, besides manage, to kill off killinga?
     
  2. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,946

    Kyllinga brevifolius is in the sedge family and is a product of TOO much water. Now in a recent experiment published in one of the trade journals Seashore Paspalum was shown to grow better when irrigated with 3 parts fresh water to one part Sea Water. PPM of salt were not given. Also there are many nutrients in sea water that were not analyzed or listed. BTW this experiment used USDA greens mix as the growing medium so a lot of leaching occurred due to the lack of CEC. I am not sure what the salt tolorants of Kyllinga is. At 2 parts fresh to one part sea water Seashore paspalum starts to decline. and 1 to 1 it dies.

    Bottom line is WHY NOT Manage??? A $ 100 bottle covers an acre and gives good control if you use it on a continuing bases. You know it works and there is no guessing of killing your turf.
     
  3. Dchall_San_Antonio

    Dchall_San_Antonio LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 327

    The reason is he's trying to be organic - hence the nature of this forum. Also I get the impression he's not a professional, so he doesn't have to stick with the commercial remedies.

    Salt won't permanently ruin the soil but it probably won't kill the sedge either. I'm experimenting with a sugar water and milk drench to kill nut sedge. I'm not a very good person to be giving sedge advice because I can kill nutgrass (nut sedge) simply by covering it up with just about any other grass. Don't ask why, because I can't explain it. Nutgrass is not a problem for me. But this experiment is in a new bed where I'm otherwise keeping the grass out.

    If you want to be organic, you simply have to skip the chemicals. You might mulch heavily, like four inches of mulch. This will bring the sedge up into the mulch where it is much easier to pull out. If this area was turf you will have a bed for a year or so.
     
  4. TClawn

    TClawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,036

    I am a professional landscaper and mow lawns. but I do not have a certified applicators license(it takes two years of experience working for someone else) . I have used manage and it does not seem to work that well on the kyllinga, although, I have had good results on yellow and purple nutsedge. btw, I did try the salt and it sets the kyllinga back alot but doesnt't kill it completly.

    david, I'd love to know how that sugar, water and milk drench worked. what are the proportions?

    if you know of anything else besides manage to kill kyllinga I'd love to hear about it.
     
  5. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,946


    Dave

    As a Retired Government Employee who has never deal with the Green Industry on a professional level or had any formal training in Horticulture until this forum, I think you are completely missing the Boat.

    As a true Trees Hugger you should Joint the Amish Religion and Grow your own food organically and not use Electric. Remember every time you go to the Grocery Store you are contributing to both woods and water polution by buying Food Products wrapped in card board and plastic. Horse and carriages can be very relaxing to ride in, if your not in a hurry. BTW they will take you home all by themselves, no matter how drunk you are.

    TC

    Manage must be applied over a long period of time to control Sedges. One application will only start the process that take a while to get control. However Sugar Water and Milk will certain be great food for you Ants and Cockroaches as well as Microbes in your soil. Now the Ants can and will help Aerate your soil, so use a lot of sugar to get a Large population of them.
     
  6. bobbygedd

    bobbygedd LawnSite Fanatic
    from NJ
    Posts: 10,178

    actually, let me help ric out here. manage should be applied at first sighting of the sprouting sedge. then again two weeks later. this proccess, reapeated 2 yrs in a row, will usually wipe out sedges for good.
     
  7. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,946


    BooBy

    I would give you credit for reading the label but, I know you have been taking classes. Therefore I am sure the info on Manage comes from your instructor. Boy would I hate to have you as a student.
     
  8. bobbygedd

    bobbygedd LawnSite Fanatic
    from NJ
    Posts: 10,178

    it comes from my personal experience. this is the way i've done it, and had success. btw, you'd love me as a student
     
  9. Could you see Ric, the teacher, teaching bobby, the student,
    or even vise versa, boy I would love to see that!
     
  10. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,946

    Tim

    Pandemonium would be an understatement in either case.

    BooBy

    The only reason I am even posting to you today is the weather. We are having the coldest day of the year. I have two pair of Long Johns on and turned the heat up. 16 MPH winds from the NNE and 60% humidity real brings the wind chill factor into play when it is only 37 degrees at sunrise. It has started to warm up just a little but the high temperature is only supposed to be 62 today. December and January are our Coldest months, but this is ridiculous.

    Now BooBy since you are the "Manage" expert. Why would it take 2 years to get rid of Sedge?? I mean how strong a plant is Sedge that it would take that much treatment to get rid of??
     
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