saw report - BX-3

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by steveair, Mar 25, 2002.

  1. steveair

    steveair LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,073

    Hello,

    Well, in previous posts someone mentioned they had the new BX-3 paver saw from MK.

    After hearing the good word, I decided to give one a shot.

    After a day of use, I am sold. It actually cut just as fast, if not faster than the 10" wet saw I've been using. Also, because of the 14" blade and the ability to use it as a chop saw, it has much more flexibility over the sliding cart stye.

    I won't say it is as powerful as a gas powered model, but it is amazingly quick for the little electric motor it has.

    The biggest thing is setting up/taking down and portability. No water to mess with and less than 100lbs to move. I was actually just sliding it around on top of my patio as I did my cuts from section to section.

    Price is also a plus. Go to ebay and you can get one for $650 delivered. I took the ad to my dealer and he sold the saw for the same price. For the money, I think it is a investment well worth looking into.

    steve
     
  2. SCAPEASAURUSREX

    SCAPEASAURUSREX LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 835

    Steveair,

    So what exactly is this thing ?? sounds like you are describing a dry tub saw ??? I like the 14" blade, good for scoring retaining wall blocks..... and large stones or notching pavers... I have a 10 " FELKER wet saw and it has the traditional sliding cart along with the ability to plunge the blade into the piece and kinda act like a chop saw if needed..... But I want to hear more about this BX 3 thing...... Talk to me....
     
  3. Stonehenge

    Stonehenge LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,277

    Steveair -

    I saw one of these at the local expo we were in. I guess it's 40 pounds or so. It still looks pretty weak to me, and the dealer really started to waffle when I asked him how it compared ti a 5 horse gas saw.

    And I have concerns about the blade: There are good sized gaps between the teeth of the blade, and I guess this is done to better cool the blade. But with a smaller surface area of diamond, these blades should wear faster for a given number of cuts. And I also worry about whether other standard diamond blades will do as well in this saw, or do we have to buy those same blades (and if we do, you know the price of those blades will be sky-high).

    So I'll likely demo one this year, and we'll compare it side-by-side to a tub saw.
     
  4. creative concepts

    creative concepts LawnSite Member
    Posts: 69

    Steveair,

    It has been awhile since I posted on here and I apologize but I told you that you would like it alot. There was a small debate about the power involved and I still think dollar for dollar it ranks right up there with the best of them ( even the gas powered saws). I also still need to contact you as I said I would, so I apologize in the delay in getting back to you about design work

    Stonehenge,

    You are correct in that the gaps are there to help cool the blade and you are supposed to let the blade run for a few seconds after a long cut to cool it even further. I ran this saw for a good 3/4 of the season last year and cut roughly about 1,200 retaining wall blocks and an uncountable number of pavers. I only had to replace the blade once. I went with the OEM style blade and it was about $200.00 which is not bad at all. As for the standard diamond blade, I have no expereince with it in this saw and the price was not that much different for me to even try it.
     

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