Sawdust as a weed barrior

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by bob, Jan 28, 2003.

  1. bob

    bob LawnSite Platinum Member
    from DE
    Posts: 4,254

    My neighbor's brother believes in natural landscaping. He's put down about 120 yards of sawdust on his sister's beds, as a weed barrior. He'll mulch it when he's done.

    dust1.jpg
     
  2. bob

    bob LawnSite Platinum Member
    from DE
    Posts: 4,254

    #2

    dust2.jpg
     
  3. troblandscape

    troblandscape Guest
    Posts: 0

    she must reallllllllllly hate weeds:blob2:
     
  4. J&R

    J&R LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 835

    I know the termites will love that. want have too chew. just fly in and start eating.
     
  5. troblandscape

    troblandscape Guest
    Posts: 0

    J&R

    so funny:cry:
     
  6. bob

    bob LawnSite Platinum Member
    from DE
    Posts: 4,254

    I told you that he's into natural landscaping. If termites come, I'm sure he has a Anteater available.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. mdb landscaping

    mdb landscaping LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,205

    looks like he even buried a few plants with it. its piled awfully high, i hope it settles more. and like said before, i think the termites will have a field day if they find that.
     
  8. lawnstudent

    lawnstudent LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 472

    This can be a very big problem (using sawdust as a mulch). What is important in selecting a mulch is the ratio of Carbon to Nitrogen or what is referred to as the C:N ratio. The microbes that consume organic matter use Nitrogen in the decomposition process. When the C:N ratio is at or below 30:1, enough Nitrogen exist in the mulch that the overall Nitrogen returned to the soil exceeds the Nitrogen consumed by the microbes during decomposition (of the mulch). Now, sawdust will have a C:N ratio of around 400:1. The Carbon content of sawdust is really high and the overall affect is that significant amounts of Nitrogem will be pulled from the soil during the decomposition of all that sawdust. Your neighbor's ornamentals are going to suffer a sever Nitrogen deficiency unless they add Nitrogen in sufficient quantities to those piles of sawdust. Good luck.

    jim
     
  9. ipm

    ipm LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 264

    I think your ? was answered:cry: Is that a weeping Norway Spruce(the one on the right near the bottom of the picture??)
     
  10. Evan528

    Evan528 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,144

    Good lord!!!:laugh:

    IPM, that is a Weeping Norway Spruce.
     

Share This Page