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Scraping Gravel drives

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by AWJ Services, Feb 23, 2011.

  1. AWJ Services

    AWJ Services LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Ga
    Posts: 4,276

    What are your techniques and tricks to whipping them back into shape?
    Here there mostly crush and run( stone with dust) and sometimes 57 stone on top?

    Just did one about 1/2 mile long maybe longer.
     
  2. bobcat_ron

    bobcat_ron LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    I use my combo bucket and landplane and kinds rip it up, then lay down an inch of crusher fines.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  3. 93turbo

    93turbo LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 482

    My drives that long and my 2 neighbors are about 3/4 that length but I use tractor and box blade. Put the rippers down 1-4" depending on wht kind of base and what shape the drives in and make a few passes till I'm sure the drive will smooth back out the way I want it. Then put the rippers up tilt the box forward if you need to drag alot of materiel to fill in holes if you just need it leveled back out tilt the box back
     
  4. Ozz

    Ozz LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 886

    I use a combo bucket, to tear it up, then regrade.
     
  5. bighornjd

    bighornjd LawnSite Member
    Posts: 215

    I sell em more gravel... :weightlifter:

    Well, not always, depends on the situation. But I do like to disturb the base as little as possible, and add new material as needed to level things out and dress up the top a bit. Makes for a nicer finished product and seems to hold up longer in my opinion. I just use a regular low profile bucket, teeth if they are really needed, but not usually.
     
  6. AWJ Services

    AWJ Services LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Ga
    Posts: 4,276

    This driveway had no gravel on it as it appeared when I started. I already had several loads of stone sold to the customer.

    I started grading the middle hump out and filling in the potholes and the more I graded the more gravel started appearing. There was also a continous berm of gravel on the outside edge with grass grown over it. I did not have anything but a tooth bucket for my skid and a Hrley Rake for my tractor.

    So I angled the harley rake and pushed all the gravle back into the road.
    Never harley raked a drive way before but it worked suprisinly well at just moving the rock.

    I will snap a few pics today.


    I do not own a combo bucket , maybe I will get one an dgive it a whirl.
     
  7. Sam_French

    Sam_French LawnSite Member
    Posts: 68

    I just ordered one for my machine. Bobcat 743B. Can't wait to try it out.

    Sam
     
  8. bobcat_ron

    bobcat_ron LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    Best investment anyone can make, skid steers are always a bit light on the front and the added weight of a combo bucket will make any loader dig and grade like a mofo.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  9. Dirtman2007

    Dirtman2007 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,366

    I use a motor grader. Angle your moldboard and roll the edges up to build a crown in the center. Then spread some crush and run or 57 stone over that and your done. I've used tractors, skids, dozers and nothing can beat a good road grader
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  10. curtisfarmer

    curtisfarmer LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 511

    A motor grader would be great, but not practical in most applications other than a long road/ drive. There is a guy around here with a full size CAT grader who claims he can grade driveways........and makes a mess since the drives are way too small for a machine of that size. He can barely turn around:dizzy: They end up having to get someone with a tractor to put it all together:laugh: I like to use a 3PT grader blade and use the blade backwards when installing new material. It provides a little downpressure and the cutting edge doesn't dig in.
     

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