Seeding Existing Lawn

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by presnallawncare, Feb 7, 2013.

  1. presnallawncare

    presnallawncare LawnSite Member
    Posts: 30

    I have a customer who has bermuda sod in her front yard that is nice and thick but then the backyard is pretty much whatever will grow with lots of bare spots. She has also planted fescue in the backyard(which is coming up ok) but wants thicker grass as quick as possible(she has the house up for sale). I am planning on aerating it in the next few weeks. My question is would I be doing any good by seeding the entire yard in bermuda after aeration? or what could I do to help the backyard out? She does currently have trugreen treat it for weeds but they are very expensive(this is why I am going to be aerating it this season). Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,097

    There is a high probability TruGreen will treat with a pre-emergent crabgrass preventer in the next few weeks. This product would block the germination of the new seed.

    Perennial rye seed would be quickest--but it becomes disease prone and cannot tolerate the heat once your temperatures regularly exceed 90.
    You need local advice--I am too far away.
     
  3. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    If you have thin lawn and lots of bare spots, then there is little value to aerating it... If TGCL has not already applied Pre-M as Riggle suggestted that they might have,,, then your best best would be to run a 'seeder' over the ground,,, rather than an 'aerator'...

    If they have pre-m'd already then you're pretty much done... it is not a good thing to give clients hope and charge them for seed when you have that herbicide soaking into your soil... if the yard isn't too large you might try plugs...
     
  4. Nate'sLawnCare

    Nate'sLawnCare LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,001

    I agree with Riggle on the perennial rye, but how much is she willing to spend? I looked at some seed prices last fall for perennial rye and it was ridiculous - if you can even find it locally. You may have to order some.
     
  5. agrostis

    agrostis LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,269

    Is that back yard shady ? Bermuda doesn't like shade at all. If you get at least 8 hour's of full sun, princess77 is the best seeded bermudagrass there is. Do NOT use common, that's a really lousy grass. It's just too hot in Villa Rica for fescue, ryegrass or any other cool season grass, use a warm season grass. For shady area's about the only thing to use is El Toro zoysia, you can only get this as sod, but if they are selling the house it might be worth it.
     
  6. presnallawncare

    presnallawncare LawnSite Member
    Posts: 30

    It does get enough sunlight for bermuda.
     
  7. agrostis

    agrostis LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,269

    Then be aware that seeded bermuda is going to take 6 month's to look like anything, and those seed's need a bare seedbed, water everyday for the first 30-45 day's and plenty of nitrogen. Tifway 419 bermuda sod might be a lot easier, you'll get instant gratification, mature grass and the sod cost's $65-75 for 500 sq. ft.
     
  8. overtona

    overtona LawnSite Member
    Posts: 55

    I would Overseed with Rye. It will germinate very quickly and stay green through the peak of real estate Season. I would not plant Bermuda until late May early June. Any earlier and you will be competing with the crabgrass.
     
  9. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,097

    I do not understand this. Doesn't Bermuda have the same temp and heat requirements as crabgrass? Wouldn't they arise at about the same time? And be strong throughout the summer months?
     
  10. overtona

    overtona LawnSite Member
    Posts: 55

    You are correct...almost. The CG seeds will germinate at slightly cooler temps than Bermuda seeds.
     

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