Seeding-tall Fescue

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by GSMOSS, Dec 29, 2006.

  1. GSMOSS

    GSMOSS LawnSite Member
    Posts: 65

    How much seed do I need per 1/4 acre and how much do I charge each customer? I will be renting a Classen aerator for $88 per day and need to recover the fee and make a profit. Does anyone know how long it will take to seed 1/4 acre using this equipment and seed on smooth terrain with few obstacles?
     
  2. dcgreenspro

    dcgreenspro LawnSite Senior Member
    from PA
    Posts: 688

    how did you get jobs lined up without giving estimates?
    You need to find out how much you can charge per M in your area. Aerify and overseed w/ starter fert combo, i think that i am bwt 25 and 30 dollars per M. hope this helps.
     
  3. GSMOSS

    GSMOSS LawnSite Member
    Posts: 65

    Well I Have Customers That I Mow And They Said That They Would Be Interested In Overseeding And I Was Wondering How Much Is The Going Rate? I Informed The Customers That I Would Be Starting This Around March Or April To Give Me Time To Line Everything Up And Get My Pricing Together.
     
  4. Ric3077

    Ric3077 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,113

    In my area the rates are around $15 per 1,000 sq ft for aeration, $12 per 1,000 for overseeding (5lbs per 1,000 sq ft) a half acre lawn is 10,890 sq ft so you would need almost 55 lbs of seed. It depends on your cost for seed and what you need to profit though, Hope this helps....
     
  5. rider

    rider LawnSite Member
    from ohio
    Posts: 152

    Tall fescue needs to go down at 6 to 8 pounds per 1000. plan on the high rate
     
  6. KS_Grasscutter

    KS_Grasscutter LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,335

    I put down 5lbs/thousand of Lesco Transition Blend and had real good results.

    My question is WHY are you aerating and overseeding in the Spring? I know around here everyone only does that kinda stuff in the fall.
     
  7. GSMOSS

    GSMOSS LawnSite Member
    Posts: 65

    Well doing it in the early spring(which is when I plan on doing this) allows the old turf the time it needs to recover from the stress of all of the damage that occurs from both of these processes. I am just trying to get a head start on information gathering to be prepared for the mission. I have only aerated and overseeded my own property for practice and needed some advice to see how or if I could do a better job. When I do my first customers, I really do not want to mess up their yards and loss them and have to pay out of my pocket to repair/replace their lawn.:cool2:
     
  8. garydale

    garydale LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 813

    Early fall would have been best. However spring will work with some changes.
    Soil temp. 50 degrees,grass mowed as short as possible and remove clippings, Aerate heavy, certified seed at 5+ lb. per M rate at a minimum, mat drag after seeding to work seed down to soil and apply "Tupersan"(siduron) pre-emergent herbicide. Use ONLY Tupersan as all others will stop the seed from coming up.
     
  9. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Tall fescue adverages around 200,000 seeds per lb, depending on germination rates and weed seeds, you will end up around 180,000 PLS (Pure Live Seeds). 8 lbs of this is 1,440,000 seeds. 1000 sqft contains 144,000 sq inches of area.
    1.440,000/144000= 10 seeds per sq in. Maybe on a new lawn install these rates would be acceptable, but not for overseeding. If you need that much seed to establish grass, you are doing something else wrong. Grass needs room to put down roots. A heavy seed rate just ensures that most of the seed you used will endup dying. Overcrowded plant density also means more fertilizer is needed because the grass roots will be stunted and unable to forage for the nutrients already present in the soil. Watering will also become critical. Stunted roots are unable to pickup the water needed for good growth. Diseases are more easily transmitted to otherwise healty plants.

    Reduceing your seed rates will ensure that more of the seed you use will survive, which translates in to less seed used and more money in your pocket. It also means less fertilizer is needed, again more money in your pocket, and less water needed for irrigation, more money in the homeowners pocket. And since the grass will be under less stress, you will decrease the likelyhood of diseases, (that are always present), from building up into problem levels that require even more chemical use, more time and labor, and more cost to the consumer. Heavy seed rates just cost more money, it doesnt neccessary mean a good healthy stand of grass.
     
  10. Ric3077

    Ric3077 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,113

    Yea what he said!
     

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