Setting fence posts

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by DFW Area Landscaper, Jan 4, 2007.

  1. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    I am trying to build my own fence and I have decided to use .095 guage metal posts.

    From what I have read on the internet, the rule of thumb is that 1/3 of the post should be underground. I will be using 10' posts, so 3.5' will be underground.

    My question is about the post holes. I plan to set each post in concrete, but how deep should I dig the post holes? I was thinking I would dig down about 2' on the post holes and drive the posts into the ground (with a sledge hammer) 1.5' below the concrete. Sound like a good idea or bad?

    Thanks for any help,
    DFW Area Landscaper
     
  2. LindblomRJ

    LindblomRJ LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,570

    Are you talking about a chain link fence?
     
  3. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    No. It is wood. If you are wondering about the odd height, 6.5', I am copy catting one of the nicest fences in my neighborhood. Treated 2X6 along the base with 6' cedar slats that run flush to the top of the post, overlapping 1" at the bottom with the treated 2X6.

    I am just sitting here thinking of all the work it will be to dig the holes and haul away the dirt and unload the dirt at the dump. The shallower the holes, the easier the work.

    How important is it to put a base of pea gravel in the bottom of the hole?

    Later,
    DFW Area Landscaper
     
  4. neversatisfiedj

    neversatisfiedj LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,028

    How high is the fence you are building ? you dont have to worry about a freeze cycle in TX.
     
  5. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    The fence will have a total height of about 6' 7". The posts will be 6' 5" from the bottom of the 2X6 rail that runs along the bottom of the fence to the top of the post.

    Roughly 3.5' underground and 6.5' above ground.

    Think a 2' deep hole for concrete is sufficient, or should it be 3' deep?

    Later,
    DFW Area Landscaper
     
  6. wurkn with amish

    wurkn with amish LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 662

    some fence companies have post drivers that ram the post into the ground.
    or get an auger to drill the holes. Most of the dirt will go right back into the hole. Whatever is left ,mound up alittle for settling purposes.
     
  7. LindblomRJ

    LindblomRJ LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,570

    The other thing that should be cleared up: are you talking about the steel "T" post? or round Galvanized tubing?

    I am thinking a post driver will work for both. I would stay away from a sledge hammer unless you want to donate a hand to the project. Might have to use cement on the ends. There is no need to haul away dirt.

    As far a pea rock, Its not your best option, gravel would be better. The gravel will "lock" together, where pea gravel will not bind.
     
  8. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    Good advice about the sledge hammer. That does seem dangerous.

    These are round fence posts. 2 & 3/8"

    Screw it. I am hiring a contractor to do this. I think I would enjoy the project a little but this contractor says he'll do the labor for a grand. I have seen his work. It is outstanding.

    Done deal. They start Monday.

    Later,
    DFW Area Landscaper
     
  9. RedWingsDet

    RedWingsDet LawnSite Gold Member
    from Detroit
    Posts: 3,556

    I use a post hole digger, fill the hole with concrete and drive the post down into the concrete to be where it needs to be. Then let set for 2-3 days and finish up the fence.
     
  10. John Zaprala

    John Zaprala LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 283

    If you think a sledge hammer is dangerous. It sounds like a contractor is a good idea. After we're insured. And at $1000 why not?
     

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