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Should I get Scotts Turf Builder EZ Seed?

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by JohnnyBeGood, Apr 1, 2010.

  1. JohnnyBeGood

    JohnnyBeGood LawnSite Member
    Posts: 13


    First I aerated whole lawn due to lots of spots in the lawn which are bold and no grass grows there.

    After that I spread the seeds (which were over a year old sitting inside the house) then with hand I've spread compost. Now after almost 4 weeks nothing really grew.

    We had 2-3 morning with frost and my guess that killed the seed or because of old seed.

    I've heard on the radio about Scotts Turf Builder EZ Seed

    My question did any of you had any luck with this?
  2. shovelracer

    shovelracer LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,009

    The compost is probably the problem. There are better & cheaper seeds out there. I would visit the local supply store first.
  3. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,211

    Year old seed may be poor. Stay away from any seed marked "Contractor's Blend" --its another word for cheapest possible. Scotts "Contractors Blend" has a high percentage of annual rye, plus some old fashioned cheap varieties. The soil may have been too cold to germinate seed. Scotts Easy Seed is OK--but it has a low percentage of seed per pound. Germination and sprouting may be better but most of the product is a water absorbing gel--only about 10 percent of the weight is actually seed. Try again with seed that was tested within 6 months of today. Scotts Turfbuilder seed is fairly good. Sow seed when temps are a little warmer. Wait until the grass is green to sow seed. Or when temps reach about 65 degrees as a high.
  4. JohnnyBeGood

    JohnnyBeGood LawnSite Member
    Posts: 13

    Thanks guys for the replies!

    Last year it was like this

    I raked it and put seeds down and then compost. Seeds grew but when it started to get hot it seems like most of them died.

    I will try this new EZ seed when weather gets warmer.
  5. betmr

    betmr LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,663

    Johnny, it's very difficult to help people with plant soil and lawn stuff, when you don't know the location of the place. There are many variables, when it comes to location. Types of grasses, amount of rain, and temperatures are all different, all over the country.

    Kind of like, someone says, I have a Lawn Mower that won't run....OK, what kind, make and model? You know what I mean.

    First, I don't know where you are, so I don't know the climate, second, I don't know what kind of seed you put down (Rye, Kentucky Blue, Fescue, St. Augustine, Bermuda etc.etc.) If I knew where you were, I might narrow it down, as some are used primarily in major regions. But also different grasses have different germination periods.

    Did you keep the soil moist ?

    I'm in the North East, so my experience is mostly with cool season grasses, Rye, KB, & Fescues. I believe guys to the south are more into the Bermuda, St. Augustine, & Rye.

    Your chances are better if the seed had been kept in a cold dry Garage, than in a warm house.
  6. JohnnyBeGood

    JohnnyBeGood LawnSite Member
    Posts: 13

    Sorry for not providing more info,

    I'm in Seattle, WA so lots of rain and not enough sun.
    Last spring when I put down seed it was "Peterson Farms Seed" this time I'm not sure which brand it was (one of those that you don't see too often) and I throw away bag.

    I kept the soil moist during the summer and I've got water bills to prove it :)

    I always though it was better to keep seeds inside house instead of cold and dry garage but now I know.

    I'll try this new EZ seed if that does not work then next year I remove all the grass put down more topsoil and lay down new sod.
    Happy Easter [​IMG]
  7. betmr

    betmr LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,663

    Happy Easter to you, as well.

    The brand of seed is not really the issue. It's the type of seed that is important, Kentucky Blue Grass, Perenial Rye Grass, Tall or Fine Fescue, etc. etc.

    I'm in the North East, so I'm not that familiar with your climate, hopefully someone from near you will drop in to help better than I can.

    Just a little thing about Nature. When you think of things in landscape work, ask yourself, "What would this do in it's natural state?" For instance the seed you saved. in the wild, that grass seed would be sitting out in the cold over the winter. You know what I mean? Have a great holiday!!!
  8. JohnnyBeGood

    JohnnyBeGood LawnSite Member
    Posts: 13

    Unfortunately I don't remember type of seed.
    I think my main problem was poor job of landscapers when the house was build in 2006. At that time it was all about quantity and speed.
    Most likely they did not put enough topsoil on a rocky ground and that's why grass can't grow.

    Anyway, we'll see...
  9. betmr

    betmr LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,663

    It's common in construction to work quick, cheap, & get out. The builder makes his money on sales not high quality landscapes. Most new owners will change it anyway.

    May I make a suggestion ? Go to Loewe's or Home Depot and pick up the Scotts or Ortho Lawn book. There is a wealth of information in them concerning lawns. I think this will be good for you, as is will give a good understanding of the materials and processes involved in Turf maintenance.

    Man, it just now occurred to me, You said Seattle. What a daa gone coincidence. My older brother lives on Mercer Island. He's not Lawn Care though, He teaches at Washington State.

    Good luck with your endeavor, get back to me if I can be of further assistance. PS: I like the bunny.


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