Shrub Browing?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Mowman, Jul 21, 2001.

  1. Mowman

    Mowman LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 553

    Any of you having trouble with yew shrubs turning brown after trimming them? Some guy's are telling me that the blades are dull. Had them sharpened and some are still browning after trimming. I'm using a Husky 225H60 Hedge Trimmer. The exhaust comes straight out the bottom of the trimmer. Do you think the exhaust HEAT is turning things brown? I'm out of ideas WHY this is happening. Thinking of going back to Electric Trimmers for the yew's and keeping the Husky for Hedges and other things that an electric just won't cut. Help me out here guy's CAUSE I'm out of things to check.
    Thanks,
    Mowman
     
  2. roscioli

    roscioli LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 749

    What are you using for lube?
     
  3. Mowman

    Mowman LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 553

    Forgot to add that I'm using the Husky UL21 Lube on the blades. Not supposed to hurt any living thing. Safe for the enviroment. Better be for $11.00 for an 8oz. can.
    Mowman
     
  4. roscioli

    roscioli LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 749

    no no, not THAT kind of lube :) haha,, jk. Hmm.. then, i dont have a clue. I once used motor oil (in a super jam, on a bush that nobody saw anyway), and it had NO effect on color. Maybe you are cutting too low or something crazy... i dont know.
     
  5. GroundKprs

    GroundKprs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,969

    Shearing most evergreens in the summer will cause some degree of browning - the more sun and the higher the temps, the more brown you get. When you shear a yew, you are damaging (cutting) thousands of needles on each plant. In shade or cooler temps, the plant will repair the wounds and you get mostly just a light grey color on the cut on each needle.

    But in the sun, especially with the temps we have been having in the midwest, the wounded needles rapidly lose moisture thru the wound, and get burned, or browned. Also in regularly sheared yews, the outer layer is so dense, that when you shear away that outer layer, the leaves inside are suddenly exposed to direct sunlight, when they had been in darkness before. This sudden exposure can lead to damage and browning to these needles also. Even when properly pruning yews, I have noticed stress on the newly exposed needles.

    If you have to shear yews in the summertime, you could try spraying with an anti-transpirant (Wilt Pruf and others), do the shearing during or right before a rain, or, if the plants are shaded later in the day, wait for the shade.
     

Share This Page