shrub/hedge recomendation

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC, Jul 8, 2007.

  1. KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC

    KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,851

    Anyone know of a good shrub for shade- partial sun, sandy soil, zone 4-5, that will work as a hedge? A child lives at the residence so unfortunatly roses or anything with sharp thorns isn't an option.
     
  2. bbpropmaint

    bbpropmaint LawnSite Member
    Posts: 60

    how about a traditional boxwood?? also evergreen..first thing that comes to mind for me
     
  3. LarryF

    LarryF LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,171

    If by "good", you mean hardy, my experience with boxwood has certainly been that. Virtually indestructable, it seems to me. At the time I bought my current home in 1985, it was already 18 or 19 years old, and the original owner had planted a boxwood that was never trimmed and therefore overgrown when I took over. I wrapped a chain around it and yanked it out of the ground with my pickup. I was going to take it down to the dump, but instead I chain-sawed the top off of what was left after pulling it out of the ground and then used an ax to divide the roots into three and planted them a couple of feet apart along the side of the house. All three grew and merged together, and today it's a 9-foot wide hedge. It grows so vigorously every year that it's hard to keep it trimmed. I'll send you a photo if you want to see it.
     
  4. joshua

    joshua LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,226

    just a quick question. how are you a certified landscape designer and not know what shrubs to put it?
     
  5. procut

    procut LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,853

    No kidding, it does raise an eyebrow.
     
  6. KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC

    KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,851

    Just because im a certified designer doesnt mean I have first hand expierience with all plants in all conditions. Its always nice to have a few other suggestions on maybe a plant thats more hardy that someone has had first hand expierience with. Or perhaps a plant that I wouldn't normally consider. Thats why generally most landscape designers work in teams, a suggestion of something different could open up a whole new range of possibilities.
     
  7. AL Inc

    AL Inc LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,218

    Try Prunus laurocerasus 'schipkaensis', skip laurel. Or rhodo maximums, or I have even used Taxus in dry, part shade conditions. Let us know what you decide on.
     
  8. KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC

    KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,851

    ended up with mountain laurel and on the ends some bugbane for a little something diffrent. Thanks!
     

Share This Page