Shrub Trimming Job (before and after Pictures)

Discussion in 'Original Pictures Forum' started by ArenaLandscaping, Jul 28, 2011.

  1. JDiepstra

    JDiepstra LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,511

    Also, nice trim job.
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    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  2. bobcat48

    bobcat48 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,176

    Looks great,nice job!
     
  3. StihlMechanic

    StihlMechanic LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,133

    I am a fan of little or no pruning to an Acer Palmatum but this is a common method for laceleafs and goes well with the lines of the other shrubs. Well done IMO. It would of looked odd had they NOT been pruned in this fashion considering they have probably been trained this way for years. Nice work!
     
  4. cborden

    cborden LawnSite Member
    from 46140
    Posts: 177

    I like the tightly trimmed Jap Maples.
     
  5. Az Gardener

    Az Gardener LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,899

    In fact there is a rule book for trimming, for trees ISA International Society of Arborculture has a lot to say. The American National Standards Institute is referred to as the ANSI 3000 standards is what all professional tree trimmers adhere to.

    Here in Az there are rules for trimming shrubs and there probably are in your state too. Do yourself and the industry a favor and educate yourself. Just because you have been doing it this way or that for 10 years and nothing has died does not make it right. I would say these trees have survived in spite of you not because of your trimming.
     
  6. GreenI.A.

    GreenI.A. LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,132

    I will start once again with complimenting your skills with the trimmer, even the skills you displayed on the maples. But my point on the maples is that they are a tree, not a shrub. They may be smaller and compact such as a shrub but their growing form is a TREE. A TREE such as a Japenese Maple should be delicately pruned. All cuts should be made at a lateral branch, bud, main stem, etc... Also, I am not sure how aware you are of the propper time to prune japanese maples, but the ISA, Mass Arborist Association, and many publications recomend pruning Japanese Maples only in the fall just before dormancy to early spring at bud break. Is not recomended to prune them mid season due to stress from the heat. You chose the hottest time of the year to prune these specimen TREES.

    I'm not trying to get on you about the work you do, it looks abesolutely great. But unfortunetly trees, especially delicate trees, need to be treated different than shrubs/bushes. I am sure if I looked at the tree, I would see hundreds of bad cuts, that are suseptable to fungas, disease, insects.

    Also, mid season pruning of maples, highly encourages early leaf drop of all of the leaves. So by doing an extream pruning in July/August your customer will have less time to enjoy the tree with its leaves
     
  7. THEGOLDPRO

    THEGOLDPRO LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,223

    you destroyed the Japenese maples
     
  8. Turf Commando

    Turf Commando LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,181

    First, I'll say you have mad trimming skills ...
    The tree isn't the best idea to make it umbrella, but I must say your one hell of a pruner/trimmer...
     
  9. ArenaLandscaping

    ArenaLandscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 230

    I am glad that you think I am uneducated. There is no rule book for what a shrub, tree , bush, or any ornamental should or should not look like. I have trained these trees to look this way with a gas powered hedge trimmer. I go through the tree with hand snips and clean up the whole tree. Spite has nothing to do with it. They have survived because they like to be trimmed that way.
     
  10. ny scaper

    ny scaper LawnSite Member
    Posts: 171

    You do some excellent work! I wish I had that skill. Makes me feel like a hack and I think I do pretty good work. What hedge trimmer you using? Never seen a JM trimmed up that way and as long as its healthy, then I see no problem with it. Its definitely different than what I see and i like it. Its all in the eye of the beholder
     

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