side jobs

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Mowerboy04, Aug 22, 2004.

  1. Mowerboy04

    Mowerboy04 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,444

    what is a reasonable amount for trimming bushes pulling weeds and spreading mulch i get $10 an hour right now.
  2. Ken Kesey

    Ken Kesey LawnSite Member
    from Here
    Posts: 115

    Maybe you should ask your parents for a raise in your allowance.
  3. precisioncut

    precisioncut LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 654

    Sounds like your charging to little. I get at least $25, even thats too little for some on here. It all depends on what you need to make and the market you live in.
  4. Firstclasslawn

    Firstclasslawn LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 341

    Ok look man if you are not making $45.00 an hour then usually you are losing out, not trying to be rude but if you want $10.00 an hour then go work at wal-mart and not have your own business...
  5. Lbilawncare

    Lbilawncare LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,116

    We have a minimum of $50.00 per man hour. $10 an hour minus taxes and insurance doesn't buy you a pot to piss in.
  6. mastercare

    mastercare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 289

    There's no right answer here. I guess it depends on your own situation.

    Are you the kid down the street earning a few extra bucks? Then, $10 might be reasonable (you probably don't pay taxes or have insurance, employees, workman's comp, etc.).

    If you're a huge company with all these extra expenses, $50/hr might be reasonable.

    The truth is, that it depends on what your situation is. If you're just doing this for side money....and have no REAL expenses, my feeling is that at the end of an hour, you're $10 better off than if you didn't get the job!

    If you run a reputable business, even a small one, you should be compensated fairly. In SE MI I get about $25/hr. Some might call this low, but it's all relative to what you're expenses/profit needs are. If I worke for $10/hr I'd be broke. If I made $50, I'd be better off.

    Without being a "scrub" or "lowballer" :

    what are your expenses, and how much profit do you want to make? If you can cover your expenses and make just as much or more profit than you could at another're doing the right thing for your situation......and probably picking up more work.

    Don't worry about what other people make.....they have big expenses that you're not hearing about. Make what you feel is appropriate for your time and costs, and you'll be happy.
  7. Randy Scott

    Randy Scott LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,915

    First thing I do with threads like this is look at the profile. The kids 15 years old. $10 an hour is great for your age. Keep at it.
  8. tiedeman

    tiedeman LawnSite Fanatic
    from earth
    Posts: 8,745

    your hourly should be based on whether it covers your overhead, and how much of a profit you want to make.
  9. all degree

    all degree LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 344

    I agree with Randy. You are doing great. Keep it up. My only advice to you would be to price by the job. In other words estimate that a job is going to take you 1.5 hours. Instead of charging $15 ($10/hr) Tell them $20 for the job.
  10. bobbygedd

    bobbygedd LawnSite Fanatic
    from NJ
    Posts: 10,178

    once again i must dissagree with dandy randy. he says, "good job, keep it up." i say there is no way you can work for $10 an hour as an operator. reason: right now you are 15 yrs old. are you building clientelle for your future? great, ok. in 3 yrs when you are 18 yrs old, and can go "legit", what are you gonna do, tell your entire customer base that the fee of $10 an hour, just went up to $45 an hour? you will end up with zero customers. this is why i say a 15 yr old CANNOT run a business. his overhead (or lack of it) cannot justify charging real market value, so if he works at a very reduced rate of pay, he will only lose this clientelle when he must start charging market value. my advice: get a job with a landscaper, let him pay you by the hour, and you will learn the business.

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