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Siena Stone Shimming

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Rex Mann, Feb 26, 2001.

  1. Rex Mann

    Rex Mann LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 621

    We are bidding a job using Siena Stone by Unilock. We have been to the hands-on seminar. However, we have no real job site installation experience.

    In the seminar they touched on the issue of shimming the diffrent courses.

    My questions are:

    How time consuming
    How often(they said every third course at the hands-on)
    How great is the learning curve to do it correctly

    Any other concerns while using this product in the field?

  2. paul

    paul Lawnsite Addict
    Posts: 1,625

    How tough is the site?
    Are they letting you use their clamp for setting the stones?

    Most walls with these units are pretty easy if you have the equipment to handle the units, shimming is not too hard, we use a pry bar and thin cuts of brick for shimms along with paver bond. How high do you have to go? a backhoe or excavator helps speed up the install, think of it as Pisa II on a grand scale, base is still the hardest to get right here if you can form the base with wood and screed off the top of it. just make it level and wide:) with a clamp it goes pretty fast. We like to use two machines for the install, a mini excavator with the bucket removed and the clamp bolted on plus a skid steer to feed, one man follows along leveling up each block as needed.

    one more thing remember these things are heavy keep fingers away :)

    [Edited by paul on 02-27-2001 at 04:31 AM]
  3. Rex Mann

    Rex Mann LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 621


    Job site has full access for all our equipment and tractor trailers.

    Wall to be 15 feet above grade.

    We would be using their clamp.

    We will have a mini-x and skid loader on site.

    Would your crew be three or four people? One on each machine plus one adjusting the blocks plus on working on the backfilling/drains. And, speaking of drains-one every 20 feet out the face sound accurate?

    Have you ever off-loaded from a semi directly into the wall. Our supplier is pushing us to do it this way. They would be charging us by the hour. With both the mini X and skid loader on site-It would not make sense to do it off the truck. Right?

  4. paul

    paul Lawnsite Addict
    Posts: 1,625

    If it's your first wall use four men, after that use three.
    As for drains I would like to give you advice but without seeing the soil types and slope it would be hard to guess, what has your soils guy said? Surcharges?

    Unload the truck, bring extra pallets, why pay an hourly charge?

    What about grid? Plan your cuts and complete your excavation before you bring out your units.

    One more thing can you access your site from the top and the bottom? With four men you might want 2 skid steers there to place back fill while you build.
  5. diginahole

    diginahole LawnSite Member
    Posts: 249

    I have never built a wall of that scale before but I have seen many go up in our area. Up here in Toronto area the crane truck from Unilock costs $50./hour. If you can use it at this site it is a far more economical way to construct a wall of that size. A mini-ex or skidsteer cant lift 15 feet high, but the crane truck can. Since you will be using at least a couple tractor trailer loads of materials the crane truck will stay on site and be fed by other trucks. The skid steer can concentrate on backfill and the excavator can go home (or to another site). There will be plenty of work to keep the labourers moving between compacting backfill and placing grids and drains and cutting, they dont need to be needlessly moving materials around the site.

    A wall that tall MUST be engineered. Follow plans exactly as to placing grids, base and fill. I think that it will also require Sienna 925 units for the first several layers. Be sure you know how its going built before you price it. I have seen specs for laying a thin (1"-2") layer of concrete on top of the sub-base to make the first row placement easier. Unilock reps in Cleveland should be able to help you with engineering and specs, give them a call. I have thier number if you need it.

    Blair D.

    [Edited by diginahole on 02-27-2001 at 03:21 PM]
  6. Rex Mann

    Rex Mann LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 621


    The wall would be engineerd. Any thing over 5 feet we get help on.

    We will have access to both top and bottom of the wall. If we get the job we will find out what works out best for this job and in the future.

    I am sure the 925s will be on the base maybe three or four courses and geo-grid throughout.

    Thanks for all the imput.


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