Single axle or Dual axle

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by wachonee, Feb 12, 2011.

  1. wachonee

    wachonee LawnSite Member
    from ct
    Posts: 8

    I am new to the business and was looking for some advice. I have a 54" ztr and a 36" walk behind. Approximate weight 1200 lbs. What is the best trailer application for residential lawns. :dizzy:
     
  2. hondarancher4435

    hondarancher4435 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 307

    depends on lots of things. what will you be towing with, how big of a trailer do you want or need. i prefer my 6x16 tandem to any single axle ive pulled tows real nice. some advantages to the tandem are less tongue weight, less tire wear, higher capacity, more brakes if you have them on all wheels, if a tire goes flat you can usually limp it home. single axles are however cheaper and cost a little less to maintain.

    if your only looking at like a 6x12 i say single axle but anything bigger go with a tandem
     
  3. bel-nor

    bel-nor LawnSite Member
    Posts: 194

    A single axle trailer at least 12 foot long and 6 foot wide should take care of your equipment. The trailers in that range can handle about 2500-3000 pounds. Keep in mind you may be hauling mulch and other associated equipment/items such as ladders, tarped leafs and landscape materials. Try to purchase a good one long and strong enough for what you will be trailering and keep in mind any new equipment you may be pondering on. I got a 5x12 because there wasn't a 5x10 at the time on the lot, believe it or not that was what I really needed. I guess like boats it's easy to get two footitus:) Good luck to you this season.
     
  4. Robert Pruitt

    Robert Pruitt LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 552

    are you sure that weight is not just the ztr? you should get a 16ft. enough room for the Z,W/B,21in. spreader and about 400# of fertilizer.
     
  5. 7625

    7625 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 63

    I always prefer a dual axel because it doesn't bounce as much as a single and in case you have a flat or blow out with a heavy load you still have a tire on that side to slow down to pull over on to the side of the road. It also makes it easier to get a jack under the trailer by having a tire on that side already having it up some. Plus when you need that extra capacity for heavier loads you have it.
     
  6. sedge

    sedge LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 33,101

    Get the shortest trailer that will work for your equipment, put the damn fert in your truck. the short trailer will help to be able to park closer to your yards.
     
  7. godzilla

    godzilla LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 401

    For somebody who is looking to expand a dual axle is the better bet. Odds are you could make do with a 12' single axle without any trouble, but if you are looking to expand you'll want a 16' or better with dual axles. I've got one that I actually want to get rid of. It's too big for the neighborhoods I work in, and I have a dump truck for hauling bulkier / heavier items.
     
  8. Robert Pruitt

    Robert Pruitt LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 552

    have other crap in my truck. this thread is about a trailer. you must have a short trailer. plus the bigger one will pull better.
     
  9. godzilla

    godzilla LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 401

    One could say that a bigger trailer will always tow better, and be right. However you still need to be able to pull it, and get it around the places you work in without too much trouble.
     
  10. wachonee

    wachonee LawnSite Member
    from ct
    Posts: 8


    I may need to put the business in a position to expand and will not be able to if I use the single axle. Do you have any more details on the trailer you have. (make, year, pics)
     

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