Skuffing on Pavestone Pavers

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by DFW Area Landscaper, Oct 5, 2003.

  1. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    I installed some Plaza I Pavestone pavers earlier this summer. When I ran the plate compactor over the top of the pavers, the very tops of the stones were skuffed. Basically, the stones were green and where the plate compactor hit the stone, it left little white markings. The markings aren't real obvious unless you look at them closely.

    Is this normal?

    The Pavestone representative told me that the scuff marks would fade over time with foot traffic. He also said that scuffing was normal when you run the compactor over the stones.

    Thanks,
    DFW Area Landscaper
     
  2. NNJLandman

    NNJLandman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,306

    Not that I know of, maybe you didn't have enough sand down on the pavers?
     
  3. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    Nope. Didn't put any sand down on the pavers. The directions from Pavestone don't mention anything about this requirement at all.

    It talks about sweeping sand into the joints, but it doesn't mention that the sand is required to prevent scuffing the actual stones.

    Here are their instructions:

    http://www.pavestone.com/retail/paver-install5.html
     
  4. Lanelle

    Lanelle LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,361

    If the tops of the pavers are textured with a molded 'pattern', they need to be protected during the compaction process. Putting a urethane or rubber pad on the plate of the compactor is one solution.
     
  5. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    ++++If the tops of the pavers are textured with a molded 'pattern', they need to be protected during the compaction process. Putting a urethane or rubber pad on the plate of the compactor is one solution.++++

    I think these would be what you consider textured. They aren't smooth on top at all. Here is what they look like:

    http://www.pavestone.com/contractor/paver_plaza1.html

    Where do you get a urethane or rubber pad for a plate compactor?

    How much do they cost?

    Seems like that would really wear out fast.

    Thanks,
    DFW Area Landscapter
     
  6. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    Here is one pic of the Pavestone install. See the scuffing. Is this something a customer should refuse payment over?

    degregario 1.1.jpg
     
  7. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    Here is another pic

    degregario 1.2.jpg
     
  8. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    Here is another pic

    When taken as a whole, the landscape looks awesome, in my opinion. However, there is some scuffing where the plate compactor ran over the stones. It's most evident in each corner of the pavestone.

    degregario 1.3.jpg
     
  9. zedosix

    zedosix LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,636

    Absolutely normal. Your defeating the purpose of compacting by placing a rubber mat between the pavers and compactor.Don't worry about it, the scuffing will be gone in no time.
     
  10. Randy Scott

    Randy Scott LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,915

    Either you didn't know the proper procedures for their product, or Pavestone failed to make you aware of it, but you really should use a pad for the plate compactor. It's a thick rubber pad that is held on with a bolt and hooks over the other end, at least on our compactor, and it protects the pavers. I have been to properties and have noticed instantly when someone hasn't done the work properly because of this procedure. The pad lasts longer than you think as well. Wouldn't matter how long it lasts anyways, it needs to be used on certain pavers, and honestly, doesn't hurt to use it on all of them when it comes to the final compaction. It's a wear and tear item that is figured into overhead. Using the pad on the compactor is the difference between contractors who care, and those that don't go the extra mile. Although the scuffs should go away, you now skipped a critical step and have to answer for it. What is easier, doing it right and not having to explain, or as you are now, backpeddling?

    As far as a customers discrepancy about payment, that will be your decision. It shouldn't have happened in the first place. Realistically, the pavers are colored throughout the entire block so the scuffs should eventually go away. How long? Who can really say. I would maybe try applying some of the infill sand, get it wet, and scrub the pavers with the original stiff bristle broom you most likely used in the sweeping process. Try to take the sharp scuff mark contrast off the paver edges. I don't know if this will work, just a thought though.
     

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