Slashbuster

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by AWJ Services, Jan 7, 2007.

  1. AWJ Services

    AWJ Services LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Ga
    Posts: 4,276

  2. Scag48

    Scag48 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,067

    A couple guys I know were looking at purchasing one of the excavator units. They are built here in WA and they are awesome performers.
     
  3. YellowDogSVC

    YellowDogSVC LawnSite Gold Member
    from TX
    Posts: 3,759

  4. Shredder

    Shredder LawnSite Member
    Posts: 4

    Hello,

    I produced those videos, glad you liked them!

    In regards to their durability I was in Texas filming a Slashbuster that had over 10,000 hours on it with no major repairs other than a new motor. They said that the motor wasn't bad but that they figured they should replace it because the excavator it was mounted on had worn out and was being replaced anyways.

    They weren't just shredding brush with it, either. When I was there I filmed them shredding a huge tree you couldn't wrap your arms around.

    I am unaware of any other brush cutter capable of this performance and longevity. I guess you get what you pay for.

    As a side note, we just sent one to the US military in Fallujah, Iraq and I have no idea what they are going to do with it.

    For more videos visit http://www.slashbuster.com/videos.htm
     
  5. YellowDogSVC

    YellowDogSVC LawnSite Gold Member
    from TX
    Posts: 3,759

    Maybe the military will use it to grind up the insurgents! :laugh:
     
  6. joe the lawn guy

    joe the lawn guy LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 523

    I want one thats the way to eliminate the competition or friend's car
     
  7. Shredder

    Shredder LawnSite Member
    Posts: 4

    Wish I could afford one myself after interviewing successful contractors who are able to retire in five years. The start up costs are so huge that there isn't much competition and these people are netting upwards of $2k/day.
     
  8. General Landscaping

    General Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 802

    That thing reminds me of the "Mauler" from the 1st season of BattleBots.

    I'd love to have that in the back yard; waiting for the next time my punk ass neighbors have a party and people start parking in my yard.
    I'd get back from Carraba's on Friday night and have a little after dinner entertainment.
     
  9. Scag48

    Scag48 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,067

    My dad and I thought about going this route before we sold our 312. The profits are pretty substantial, but you're working for the USFS and all of the jobs are open to bids. There's a little hoop jumping with the USFS and there will be other bids, unless there is quite a few parcels open to bid for the year and the work is spread out. However, there is nobody within reasonable distance of Chelan with an excavator mounted mulcher. A local contractor took on a 100 acre USFS parcel was using hand labor to get the brush on the ground, then a mini ex to tote to a chipper. Probably the slowest, most PITA way of going about the job. I wish we would have held on to our 312, bought a cutting head, and gone at it. No BS customers, just go after it once you get the bid. Only downside is that in July and August the USFS will shut you down, so you need to be able to take the mulcher off and go digging for a couple months to keep the machine busy. And having a low hour excavator is the only way to go, if you have a down machine a lot you may miss the deadline, then the USFS will pull the plug on you and you can kiss your chances for next year goodbye.
     
  10. Shredder

    Shredder LawnSite Member
    Posts: 4

    From what I hear it is hard to make a buck working for the USFS. They are still trying to figure out how to determine the "best value" contract and often just take the lowest bid. Problem is that the low bid often can't complete the job so it goes out for rebidding and sets projects behind in time and money. And yes, they are going to shut you down for both fire danger (time to put machine to work on local fires, the pay is very good) and soil moisture.

    There is a lot of work to be done clearing lots for real estate sales, reducing fuel loading on private property, clearing roadside vegetation, powerline vegetation, etc... There will be a need for this equipment as long as plants grow.

    I totally agree that having a low-hour machine is key to max performance and minimum downtime, resell them at 2000 hours if you can.
     

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