slice seeding question

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by weekendDIY, Oct 16, 2004.

  1. weekendDIY

    weekendDIY LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 43

    I had my lawn slice seeded but not really sure if they did anything. Maybe somebody can help me understand better.

    They did my lawn 11 days ago and I see nothing growing yet. When they did it I didn't see any starter fert or grass seed. When I called them the woman at the desk told me that 1)the starter fert might have been brown and might not be able to be seen on the dirt 2) that when the slice seed they "blast" the seed into the ground up to 3 inches down. She said I should give it 2-3 weeks to grow. Does any of this sound right?

    I look in the tracks that the slicer made and I see no seed but I didn't dig down very deep (only really scratched the surface).

    Thanks
     
  2. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    I doubt that they blasted the seed 3 inches into the ground. A slice seeder works by sliceing a furrow into the soil and depositing seeds in that furrow. They probably didnt go no deeper that about 1/2 in. Whether or not you see fertilizer would depend on the amount and type of fertilizer used. Starter fertilizers tend to be dark brown in color because of the high amounts of phosphorous contained in those fertilizers. If you look hard you will probably see a few white specs as well. This would be the Nitrogen. The amounts used would depend on the fertilier blend as well as the soil requirements. A typical 50lb bag of starter fertilizer will cover about 5000 sqft. That would make it hard to see in an already established stand of grass. Did the guy doing the job do it right, hard to say. Does the girl that you talked to on the phone know what she is talking about. Didnt sound like it to me. She is correct that you should give it a few weeks to grow. Seed germination will depend a lot on the temperature as well as the moisture available to the seed. If it is blasted three inches deep into the soil, you will probably never see that stand of grass.
     
  3. weekendDIY

    weekendDIY LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 43

    Thanks for the info

    Should I be able to see the seed though? I can't seem to find any

    Thanks
     
  4. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Usually the slice seeder has a packing wheel that will pack the soil, along with the seed, back into the slice furrow. To find seed it will be necessary to scratch directly in the furrow. You should be able to find a few seeds or you can just wait a few more days and see if anything comes up. I would just about guarantee you that your seed person isnt going to come back and redo the job until sufficient time has past to insure that the seed can germinate. Do you know what kind of seed was planted? Some seeds take longer to germinate than others. 11 days is barely sufficient time for rye grasses. Bluegrasses can take 21 days. All seeds will take longer if the weather is colder. Temperatures below 50 degrees and the seed could lay dormant all winter and not emerge until spring.
     
  5. weekendDIY

    weekendDIY LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 43

    Thanks for the info
     
  6. aben8057

    aben8057 LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 3

    I rented a slice seeder from Home Depot and did the project myself.

    The blades sliced into the dirt about a 1/2" with the seeds dropping from the front of the seeder as I pushed.


    I would assume that there should be some signs of seed on the dirt...
     
  7. weekendDIY

    weekendDIY LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 43

    3 weeks after the first slice seeding I called them back and the owner came out. He agreed to re-seed the lawn, which he did last week. But now that it is getting cold (NJ) will that affect the seed. I don't see any growth but I assumed that it is too cold out. Since the grass hasn't grown will this affect the seed or will it just come in during the spring?
     
  8. mtdman

    mtdman LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,137

    It really depends on the soil temps. I've seen grass grow after a late seeding, and I've seen nothing happen. Sometimes in the fall when you seed, you will not see a lot of growth from new seed, although the grass seed germinates and grows roots, it'll pop up in the spring. Hard to tell, seeding is a tricky thing and there are a lot of variables. Last year I dumped all my left over seed in a bare patch in my lawn in early Nov and it all grew grass in the spring.

    You should have had him do it in the spring instead. Too late now though. Good luck.
     
  9. bif

    bif LawnSite Member
    from PA
    Posts: 68

    Actually, I've read on several websites now that a dormant seeding is better than a spring seeding...provided the ground is thawed enough to seed into...

    it's often listed as the fall being the best time (sept.-oct.) then dormant (dec.-feb.) then spring...

    so this year I'm gonna do a little seeding in January if the weather permits...

    Steve
     

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