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Slit seeded September 30th - when can I cut

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by yourchoice, Oct 20, 2007.

  1. yourchoice

    yourchoice LawnSite Member
    Posts: 1

    Hello all,

    First and foremost, I searched around for an answer to this before posting, but couldn't seem to find my answer.

    I live in Southern New Jersey (near Philadelphia) and slit seeded my lawn on September 30th. My seedlings are germinating nicely, but my existing grass is becoming quite tall. At what point (what height) is it safe to cut the grass considering the youth of the seedlings. BTW I seeded with fescue.

    Any input is greatly appreciated.
  2. Landude

    Landude LawnSite Member
    Posts: 18

    I have been over seeding like crazy since the end of August with a Fescue blend. I water daily and usually cut around two weeks. I cut at 3" and bag.
    It looks very happy..
  3. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,496

    You mow now. Rule of thumb...You mow the grass when it gets high enough....new or not.
  4. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    As long as the grass has rooted a gentle mowing with a walk behind should be safe and do little if no damage. Just make nice easy turns and you wont rip out new seedlings, also make sure ground is pretty dry so you do not rut.
  5. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    ...and you MUST cut newly germinated grass with very sharp blades! As a rule of thumb in the industry with fescue, the first cutting of the year, and the last cutting of the year should always be the shortest. At these times, it's almost always cool, and it's important to go into the dormant season especially (winter) cutting a bit low because it allows for better air circulation in the crown. And the rule is to raise the blades right along with the thermometer as the spring progresses.

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