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Slit seeder - How does it work?

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Lawn-Scapes, May 18, 2005.

  1. Lawn-Scapes

    Lawn-Scapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,810

    I've never used one before... Pictured is the underside of a Olathe slit seeder. Can someone explain to me what the toothed discs do and what the round/smooth discs do? I'm guessing the toothed disc opens up the ground and the round one pushes the seed into the opening... right???

    If I were to use this machine on an already established lawn.. will it pull up a lot of thatch?

    slitseeder.jpg
     
  2. Drew Gemma

    Drew Gemma LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,511

    do not use it on an established lawn! If you wanna do that use an aerrator. Slice seeder is for reseeding an existing yard that you completely kill then use the old dead vegatation as a seed bed. it puts heavy amounts of seed down and you can streak an existing lawn by using it on them.
     
  3. rick2752

    rick2752 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 161

    I dont agree, Ive used them on existing lawns and they do an excellent job of filling a thin lawn. Tom, that seeder is a little better than mine, I have a bluebird. From looking at they pic I would say that the front blades cut the slit into the ground, tubes drop the seed into the existing slit and then the round blades in back work as a disc to close the slit you just made. The round blades dont line up with the toothed blades do they? The only time they streak a lawn is when you cut corners and only slice in one direction. You are supposed to do the whole lawn in one direction and then cover it again diagonally. That will take care of the "cornrows" you would see otherwise.
     
  4. dkeisala

    dkeisala LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 911

    Agreed - slit seeders are fine for exisiting lawns. I've done it on my own lawn with excellent results.
     
  5. Lawn-Scapes

    Lawn-Scapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,810

    Thanks for the comments. Will it pull up thatch too? I need to know if there will be a lot of clean up...
     
  6. rick2752

    rick2752 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 161

    No not alot of cleanup it just cuts a slit in the dirt. It may slice through the thatch but not really pull it onto the top of yard. I havent ever really done a heavily thatched yard with one though.
     
  7. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,496

    That's one of the beautys of a slit seeder. It allows you to incorporate different cultivars of grass into an existing one/ For instance, if you have a lawn, that as the trees mature, you get alot more shade. You can plant more crreping Red Fescue into the existing lawn. Say the opposite, and trees are removed. You can plant Bluegrass into it. I had a yard that was mainly perrenial Rye...In the fall, I cut it down low, and drilled in some Kentucky Blue. The lawn is beautiful, now. They are just awesome machines. I don't know what the Olathe sells for, but one you can't hardly beat for the price is a Lesco. They are around 2400, I believe.
     
  8. JohnnyRocker

    JohnnyRocker LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 739

    How long does it take to slice seed a 1/4 acre established yard, if you do it twice, one direction plus diagonnally?
     
  9. Az Gardener

    Az Gardener LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,899

    I bought one mostly to verticut my Bermuda runners and prevent thatch build up. The seed box on the front is so small how do you get any amount of seed down with that thing? Either I am missing a critical part or you slice a bag of seed and set it on top of the box. That's my guess anyway, I would like a yea or nae on this if anyone knows. I am thinking of using it for my fall scalp and over seeding for winter lawns, perennial rye.
     
  10. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,783

    I would think it would take no more than 2.5 hours, tops.
     

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