slit seeding

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by lawnpro724, Mar 19, 2008.

  1. lawnpro724

    lawnpro724 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,201

    I got a call today about slit seeding a 9,000sqf lawn and the lady I spoke with told me she had two other estimates that were $400 each. This seems kinda high to me but was just wandering what everyone else thinks about it.
     
  2. McVey Landscaping

    McVey Landscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 131

    Never done it before, usually I just put extra core plugs in the over seed. Where I buy my seed they just bought a new slitter, want me to try it this year.
    :usflag:
     
  3. amscapes03

    amscapes03 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 398

    Do you have a power seed slicer? If not it's probably around $75.00 a day to rent. A good quality seed will run you at least $80.00. So there's $155.00 before you even start. $400.00 for 9,000 sq. ft. is what? .045 cents a sq. ft. After your time to pick-up and drop off machine, buy seed, and do the slicing.......$400.00 sounds about right to me.
     
  4. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    A decent seed is going to run you closer to around $150. Say for instance you are going to plant TTTF. this is around 1.45/lb, or $75 per 50# bag. It is planted at 8 to 10 lbs. per M. This amounts to around 90 lbs. (2 bags). Then, you are going to need a bag of starter fert.. There is probably another $25, if we are being told right of this years prices. Myself, I would charge for, and do two applications.
    If I was going to bid that, I would come in at around 75 to 80 per M. (675 to 720).
     
  5. DiyDave

    DiyDave LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,695

    Amscapes03 has it closest to right. Remember that when you are powerseeding, you are cutting small grooves into established turf. If you were to place these grooves side by side touching, the area tilled per 20 inch pass is actually 1/4" X 20 = 5 inches, so the seeding rate will be adjusted proportionally similarly so your seeding rate needs to be a quarter of the recommended 8 lbs/M rate. If you seed too heavy with one of these machines, you will have a cornrow effect that is not only ugly, but at these localized, high populations of seedlings are more prone to pythium fungus wiping out all of the seed at once!:hammerhead:
     
  6. lawnpro724

    lawnpro724 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,201

    I own all of my own equipment and the only thing I need to rent from time to time is a large front loader w/backhoe besides that I have everything else.
     
  7. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    This (the rates I gave) is based on rather bare ground...the point at which most residents then think they need seed. It also varies on different types of seed. I used TTTF as an example.

    LOL.:laugh: You ARE only kidding, right? So you are saying that since the blades are an inch and a half from each other, and the slits are 1/4" wide, that the recommended 8 to 10 lbs. per M should be reduced to 2 lbs. per M? That islike saying sine my paint brush is only 3 inches wide compared to this 12" roller, I only need to use 1/4 the amount of paint to paint this wall.
    I'm not sure how much slit seeding you have done, anyone that is knowledgeable and experienced with a slit seeder will tell you that it is recommended to put down ATLEAST the recommended rate (per type of seed) at half rate times two passes (different directions)
     
  8. DiyDave

    DiyDave LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,695

    That is one of the things that makes America great. We can all have our say. What I am saying is that if you are seeding into a thin lawn, and you put down 8lbs/m (one pass), you are screwing your self, in 2 ways. 1st, you are spending more on the input(seed), 2nd, by making ugly looking lawns, you won't get many referrals, or repeat business. If you don't believe me, do a side by side comparison, with varying rates, in an irrigated lawn, and see how each looks after 2 years. What I am saying comes from my experience in the mid atlantic area, using lesco transition blend seed, mostly seeded in the fall seeding window. Different areas may have different results, that's why I say do the test!:waving:
     
  9. DiyDave

    DiyDave LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,695

    That is one of the things that makes America great. We can all have our say. What I am saying is that if you are seeding into a thin lawn, and you put down 8lbs/m (one pass), you are screwing your self, in 2 ways. 1st, you are spending more on the input(seed), 2nd, by making ugly looking lawns, you won't get many referrals, or repeat business. If you don't believe me, do a side by side comparison, with varying rates, in an irrigated lawn, and see how each looks after 2 years. What I am saying comes from my experience in the mid atlantic area, using lesco transition blend seed, mostly seeded in the fall seeding window. Different areas may have different results, that's why I say do the test!:waving:
     
  10. DiyDave

    DiyDave LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,695

    Something went awry in the editing process. Dave
     

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