Slow Relesae Fert

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by Stan MI, Mar 28, 2007.

  1. Stan MI

    Stan MI LawnSite Member
    from MI
    Posts: 101

    In general, isn't all granular fertilizer slow release.

    I am looking to put down 12-12-12 mostly just because it's less expensive than 30-5-12 (or what ever other set of 3 numbers you want) .

    Sales person says 12-12-12 won't stay on the lawn for more than 2 weeks. I thought the only difference in product was the amount of each chemical not the release.
     
  2. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    No, all fert is not slow release.

    12-12-12 ia a fert blend commonly used on gardens. The nitrogen source is usually urea. It won't last long. the Phosphorus is probably rock phosphate and will take a while longer to break down. The potash souce is likely muriate of potash. These may vary, but the fact is 12-12-12 is a cheap fertilizer because is uses cheap nutrient sources.

    Do yourself a favor and use a fert blend for your lawn that is either poly coated, sulfur coated, water insoluble, or otherwise slow release. This info is on each bag. To further fine tune your lawns fert requirements, get a soil sample done to target the specific nutrients that are lacking. Your lawn will thank you and so will the environment. As an example, MI has issues with phosphorus is the water. I haven't tested a lawn yet that needed phosphorus. By adding 12-12-12, you are more than likely contributing to the phosphorus load that is going to end up in our lakes and streams.
     
  3. Stan MI

    Stan MI LawnSite Member
    from MI
    Posts: 101

    Mike

    Thanks for the response !!!

    You listed several things to look for in a fertilizer. Where, in your opinion, would be the best place to look. Rhino Seed, TSC or grain elevator.
     
  4. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    I don't know where in Mi you're located, but you may have some luck at a local elevator. I know UAP is now carrying ferts targeted to the lawn industry. If nothing else is available around you, you can always go to a Lesco as a last resort. Lesco makes a decent fert (poly coated), right up until they put the MOP (muriate of potash) in it. I prefer a SOP (sulphate of potash), but for some reason, Lesco doesn't/can't/won't offer a blend with SOP that I want.
     
  5. Stan MI

    Stan MI LawnSite Member
    from MI
    Posts: 101

    I'm close to Lansing. Not familiar with UAP. I'll try the elevator in Webberville. Closest Lesco I know of is in Brighton.

    Thanks Again !!
     

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