1. cutntrim

    cutntrim LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 474

    We'll probably be out for the first time tonite since they're calling for 2&quot; accumulation plus drifting. I'd rather start the year off easy like that, rather than last year when our first plow was the 12&quot; blizzard in early January. We'll be able to try the wings we put on our 8' Meyers.<p>----------<br>Dave in S.Ontario<br>
     
  2. plowking35

    plowking35 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S.E. CT
    Posts: 1,687

    12&quot; blizzard, is that what you Canucks consider a Blizzard.<br>In The US I would be laughed off the road if I considered 12&quot; a blizzard. Here we need at least 18&quot;<br>
     
  3. cutntrim

    cutntrim LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 474

    Ha.Ha.Ha. You're a funny guy Sully, I like you, that's why I'm going to kill you last.
     
  4. cutntrim

    cutntrim LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 474

    A &quot;blizzard&quot; is a storm with an air temperature of at least -18C producing significant snowfall accumulation and severe windchill values. Trust me...it was a blizzard.
     
  5. Chuck Smith

    Chuck Smith LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 849

    Blizzard describes the conditions.<br>Here it is, straight from The Weather Channel. <br>I quote:<br> &quot;Blizzards <br>Blizzards are characterized by low temperatures (usually below 20 degrees Fahrenheit) and accompanied by winds that are at least 35 mph or greater, there must also be sufficient falling and/or blowing snow in the air that will frequently reduce visibility to 1/4 mile or less for a duration of at least 3 hours. <p>A severe blizzard is considered to have temperatures near or below 10 degrees Fahrenheit, winds exceeding 45 mph, and visibility reduced by snow to near zero. <p>Blizzard conditions often develop on the northwest side of an intense storm system The difference between the lower pressure in the storm and the higher pressure to the west creates a tight pressure gradient, which in turn results in very strong winds. <p>These winds combine with snow and blowing snow to produce extreme conditions. Storm systems powerful enough to cause blizzards usually form when the jet stream dips far to the south, allowing cold air from the north to clash with warm air from the south. <p>With the colder and drier polar air comes atmospheric temperatures cold enough for the development of snow, sleet, or freezing rain. <p>The Dakotas and parts of Minnesota were pounded by a succession of blizzards in the winter of 1996-1997. With few trees or other obstructions to reduce wind and blowing snow, this part of the country is particularly vulnerable to blizzards. &quot; End quote.<p>Everyone clear on what blizzard conditions are now? ;&gt;)<p>~Chuck Smith<p><p>----------<br>Chuck's Chevy Truck Pages - Snowplowing Central<br>http://members.aol.com/csmith669/plowcentral.html
     
  6. plowking35

    plowking35 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S.E. CT
    Posts: 1,687

    Yes it was meant to be a funny post, tounge in cheek reply to the 2&quot; minimum cutandtrim mentioned in his last post.<br>We do medical facilities that require no accumulation, they need a black and wet policy, so we start work at the first flake, we preapply our coated granular anti/de-icers, then start plowing when about 1/2 has accumulated. We dont set the policies, we just cash in on them. We get twice the plow time as my competition, and that means the same income with 1/2 the accounts.<br>Dino<p>----------<br> Professional Ice and Snow Management <br>Products:Services:Equipment www.sima.org
     
  7. Chuck Smith

    Chuck Smith LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 849

    Speaking of deicing and anti-icing, there's another article in this months Issue of The Landsculptor. Part of the Snowfighter series. Great info.<br>Go to www.landscape.org/ and click on The Landsculptor. Scroll the contents in the left frame, for snowfighters.<p>~Chuck Smith<br><p>----------<br>Chuck's Chevy Truck Pages - Snowplowing Central<br>http://members.aol.com/csmith669/plowcentral.html
     
  8. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    The Northeast is stuck in a bad weather pattern for snow. We have the cold temps required for snow, but the jet stream is in the wrong posistion. There are records falling all over maine, this may be the first december the parts of maine haven't recieved any snow yet. Lets hope the weather pattern changes so the the people in the northeast can see some snow.<p>Geoff
     
  9. nsmilligan

    nsmilligan LawnSite Member
    Posts: 121

    Glad you guys have got what a blizzard is , figured out! I,m on my 4th straight day of plowing here in Nova Scotia. MONEY SNOW 2&quot; or less, light, and fuffy, and temps in the day time around frezing so the lots come out black, eat your hearts out guys! May you all be so lucky in 2000!
     
  10. SLSNursery

    SLSNursery LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 442

    Well, here in Connecticut I have been watching the weather channel (evidently not as much as Chuck, though!!!), looking for any sign of the white stuff. None yet, but at least the plows are all painted and ready to go.<p>----------<br>Phil Grande - Soundview Landscape Supply<br>http://members.aol.com/scagrider
     

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