snowblowing?

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by DiSantolandscaping, Oct 27, 2011.

  1. H & M Yard Improvements

    H & M Yard Improvements LawnSite Member
    Posts: 214

    Yes there is lots of lowballers out there that make it harder for everyone else. They lowball everyone else and then once they have a huge workload, they cant keep up with expenses and wind up going out of buisness because they have no clue what expenses are and think that what they make off of everything is just pure profit. . Then when one of us who knows what we need to charge comes in to replace them, the customer says my last guy did it for "X" amount making us look like we are trying to rip them off. My belief is that if you dont know what to charge, you probably shouldnt be doing it in the first place.
     
  2. KeystoneLawn&Landscaping

    KeystoneLawn&Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 774

    The area you are in is going to dictate the rate you can charge. Here in Erie, 25 for a average city drive and walk is about right. Most important though, don't charge low just to build a route. Better to have a reasonable rate to fit your area and build slowly than charge low and end up with a full route of cheap accounts. Do your best to figure the going rate in your area. Talk to friends or relatives who use snow services to see what they are paying. In the beginning your hourly gross isn't going to be the best. Once you have filled in your route your hourly gross will get much better. Takes time to build a solid route. Good Luck.
     
  3. DiSantolandscaping

    DiSantolandscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 346

    i know most dont like the idea but i use contracts with both res and comm accounts because ive asked around and thats what all the other guys in this area are doing, they say it so that both the lco and the home/business owner know what to expect and so on.

    on the side note we are supposed to get 6 to 10 in of snow tonight. :cool2:
    so well see how things go.
     
  4. 32vld

    32vld LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,984

    You sound young and let your enthusiasm get you seeing $$$$$ to easily.

    You can't charge crazy just because a customer wants salt.

    Yes there can be harm to you. When you start giving crazy quotes people are not going to want to do business with you and you will hurt your chances of up selling other things to them. Or them considering you to comeback in the spring to give estimates to do landscaping for them.

    Also fisrt year did not get much business.
    Second year did much better. Enough to again next year.
    Third year, I had more people then I could get to on a couple of storms so I added a second blower. Did well.

    So be prepared to not do so well at first.

    Also what state do you live in?
    Average snowfall over the last ten years?
     
  5. 32vld

    32vld LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,984

    Also add this to think about. You may not make enough money the first year to pay back what your blowers cost let alone make profit enough to buy landscape equipment.

    But you'll have the blowers for the years to come.
     
  6. lawnpro724

    lawnpro724 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,201

    I couldnt disagree with you more. We keep getting more and more customers requesting snow blowing instead of plowing and their number one complaint is a torn up lawn and scratches in their drive. Price is their least concern.
     

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