Soil Perculation

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Smallaxe, Jun 28, 2012.

  1. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    I don't necessarily agree with this. Some sites and soils need help, especially under heavy usage patterns.
     
  2. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,113

    Did not say that grass growing without outside inputs would do this. I should know. Withhold water and nutrients from a turf site in my area and it is no longer turf.
     
  3. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961


    Provided I could actually get a representative sample.
     
  4. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    I was speaking with respect to managing a soils physical properties.
     
  5. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,113

    You mean that for all of the restrictions, permits, and inspections on everything else, doing that to soil in a residential area is allowed? Does not compute or add up.
     
  6. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,113

    Of course.
     
  7. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    If the client does not want to pay for aeration and compost then the best we can do is manage the fert program. I will say again, the turf is the best source for adding organic matter to the soil but aeration and composting will kick start the program
     
  8. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,113

    I have seen time and time again how a good fertility program produces immediate as well as long term results. I have also seen a compost topdressing produce immediate results. Neither way is wrong especially if they are utilized under the right circumstances. I do feel foolish adding more organic matter to soil that is running 10-14% OM when there are other issues actually causing the problems. Most of my problems have nothing to do with OM content,
     
  9. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    Most native soils even rich soils do not have more than 5% OM
     
  10. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,113

    They do here. It is from undecomposed roots, stems and thatch. Lots of our thatch here is caused by starvation. When the grass does not have enough N, it resists breakdown.
     

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