Soil Perculation

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Smallaxe, Jun 28, 2012.

  1. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    Someone please kill me now.
     
  2. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    Can you come to Texas and operate an aerator in 105 heat? :laugh:
     
  3. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    Why bother? It is just going to create "clay pots".

    It is threads like these that drive me insane, with very little (if any) accurate or useful information in them. So far, someone reading this thread might walk away thinking it is a good idea to irrigate daily, aeration is worthless, molasses fixes low infiltration rates, etc....

    Then people read this garbage, do it and/or spread it around, and the whole ignorant cycle continues.
     
  4. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    Sad but I thought we might get some where with this one too.

    Over stimulation of the microbes with nothing but sugar has to deplete carbon. No wonder the ants did not show up for the party. :laugh:
     
  5. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    I don't have a problem with using molasses ... for the right reasons.
     
  6. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    I like sugar in my tea too but I can not live off it
     
  7. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,823

    Yes. I have dealt with soils where the outstanding feature is high alkalinity from bicarbonates and magnesium equal to or higher than calcium. These soils feel like grease or artist's clay when wet. When dry, they crack and resist wetting. That is where soil testing comes in. My exact procedure is to apply all of my N as calcium nitrate and apply 20 lb of sulfur per 1000 sq ft per year in divided doses. Alternating ammonium sulfate and calcium nitrate is another option. You will not get that from your average turf blend. This program is not to be applied as a single application. It is to be spoon fed. If you are dealing with turf that cannot be regularly fed nitrogen such as tall fescue, then calcium sulfate and sulfur should be applied. I think I am the only person in the state to apply calcium nitrate to turf outside of the golf people. They use it because calcium becomes a necessary nutrient when the turf is being grown on silica and peat moss.

    The action of trying to force tines into the soil often creates further compaction. Then there is the problem of what to do with the plugs. If the soil is that bad, there is no good reason to leave them there. You would want to take them up and fill the lawn with about 1/2 of non reactive sand. I mention non reactive sand because most sand sold in my area is ground up coral.

    It is amazing what attention paid to soil chemistry can do vs turning lawn care into a Buddhist ritual of high labor manual operations and continuing to apply what the Lesco people tell you to use.
     
  8. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,823

    1:1 Ca:Mg is normally a problem. I want 5:1 or higher. Watch your calcium source. You normally do not want lime unless the soil is acid and I know most soils in Texas are alkaline.
     
  9. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    we put down lime and make roads.
     
  10. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    Using any thing but hollow core tines will worsen compaction in clay.

    Do not aerate when excessively wet or dry either.

    If you do have some decent rooting activity in the top few inches you can leave the plugs. Other wise clean them up.
     

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