Soil test results

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by Armadillolawncare, Feb 26, 2007.

  1. Armadillolawncare

    Armadillolawncare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 570

    I had the local extension office do a soil test for me and know I need some help reading and putting together a plan of action based on the results. Could someone please help me. The grass is Bermuda.
     
  2. Armadillolawncare

    Armadillolawncare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 570

    I had the local extension office do a soil test for me and know I need some help reading and putting together a plan of action based on the results. Could someone please help me. The grass is Bermuda.

    pH 7.8 Critical level (CL)- 6.2 Moderate Alkaline
    Conductivity 272
    Nitrate 1
    Phosphorus 29 CL - 50
    Potasium 324 CL - 175
    Calcium 8345 CL - 180
    Magnesium 443 CL - 50
    Sulfur 23 CL - 13
    Sodium 168

    Fert Recommended
    0.9 lbs N/1000
    1.2 lbs P205/1000
    0 lbs K20/1000
    0 lbs Ca/1000
    0 lbs Mg/1000
    0 lbs S/1000

    The only thing I can't show you is the bar graph for each item.
     
  3. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,216

    Take your soil test results to Lesco and get the percentage of Nitrogen and Phosphorus mix to fulfil the recommendation. You may have go mix your own based on that analysis. But that is easy enough. You will need to know the number of 1000 sq. ft units. Not rocket science.
     
  4. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,341

    Armadillo,
    I am from Michigan--stilll 6 inches snow here.

    Take grass sample, pictures and the soil test to your Lesco rep. Shop around, take it to another dealer, too--get more than one opinion. The various dealers will explain the difference between bermuda and St aug. Its a free education. Do you have patches of bermuda in St aug? My daughter in Norfolk has this problem.

    About the phosphorus recomendation. Seems a little high to me. I attended a recent seminar and on a soil deficient in phos( under 20), turf professor found that there was no response at all to added phos. On Kentucky bluegrass, of course. Maybe Bermuda needs a lot of phos. Or maybe the soil test is a general farmer's recommendation that is more suitable for growing corn or cotton or whatever it is you grow around San Antone.

    Unless proven deficient, application of phos to turf has been outlawed in Minnesota and in the county next to mine in Michigan. It contaminates water, causing algae blooms.
     
  5. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,216

    Yea RigglePLC, I was thinking along the same lines. It's hard to imagine that there would be a depletion of Phosphorus even in sandy soil. I'd take another test or just be very sceptical. Generally it will build up. I can see that there could be a need for Potassium (Potash) Armadillo--let us know
     
  6. Armadillolawncare

    Armadillolawncare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 570

    It is a full Bermuda lawn, no St Augustine grass mixed in. The lawn was installed 2 years ago and has always looked good. I don't know how much help pictures would be right now as the Bermuda is still dormant and it was overseeded with winter rye. The soil is clay.
     
  7. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,957

  8. hmartin

    hmartin LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 590

    Phosphorus levels are low in much of the South. Most of the lawns that I tested this year showed P levels in the 10 to 25 pounds per acre range. The product that Ric mentioned seems like a very good choice.

    Since you are dealing with bermuda, and your potash levels are already extremely high, you may want to make an application of DAP 18-46-0 for your first growing season round. This product doesn't have the 50% PPSCU or the SOP like the product Ric mentioned, but would provide a good source of P with some N at very economical price.
     
  9. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,957

    hmartin

    IMHO Plants of any kind can't get enough K, Turf is many individual plants. The difference of Chlorine levels in the two Blends is great enough to off set the cost. This turf is already under stress and needs all the help it can get.
     
  10. hmartin

    hmartin LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 590

    Ric,
    You will have to make it simple for me to understand. Without a long chemical equation, how does di-ammonium phosphate produce chlorine?
     

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