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Soil test reults...help me out

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by stryper, Apr 8, 2005.

  1. stryper

    stryper LawnSite Member
    from IL
    Posts: 132

    Rather than just experiment with different products blindly, as was obviously implied by my "downside to iron" thread, I'm wanting to take at least a somewhat intelligent approach to this fertilizer thing. So I was just looking at the results of a soil test I had done by a local ag lab last year, and they they gave me the following:

    Soil Test Results
    pH: 7.2
    Phosphorus (lbs/acre): 39
    Potassium (lbs/acre): 246

    Recommendations for Turfs and Lawns
    Nitrogen: 4 lbs/1000 sq. ft
    Phosphate: 2 lbs/1000 sq. ft
    Potash: 1 lbs/1000 sq. ft
    (no recommendations about the pH)

    Now, most of the Lesco products I used last year were pretty low in P--21-0-12(weed & feed), 24-5-11 (Merit), 24-0-11, 34-3-11. And I do recycle my clippings. So I think my N#s are probably okay now, as I am trying to be regularly on top of things, but it seems a 2 to 1 ratio of P and K are/were needed and never really addressed. So would a product like Lesco 18-24-12 be more appropriate than some of the other products I've mentioned in the previous thread? Reading the label, it says that at the recommended rate I would get 1 lb/1000 sq.ft., which is only half what the lab suggests, but I would think this is at least a step in the right direction. (I couldn't find anything else with that sort of ratio that's locally available.)

    Thanks again.

  2. kickin sum grass

    kickin sum grass LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 628

    if my math is right appling the 18-24-12 at 4.1 lbs/1000 will give you just under .75 lb of N - 1 lb of P and .5 lbs K.
    I would do this product a couple times this year.
  3. stryper

    stryper LawnSite Member
    from IL
    Posts: 132

    Does everyone else concur?
  4. Garth

    Garth LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 382

    Take into account that 18-24-12 is a percentage ratio and not active ingredient amount i.e. the pounds of product applied will not give you the pounds of "active ingredient" needed.

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