Sol U Cal

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by Keegan, Oct 8, 2008.

  1. Keegan

    Keegan LawnSite Senior Member
    from CT
    Posts: 605

    Has anyone ever used this product?
    Any thoughts on it?

    Thanks!!
     
  2. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    how low is the calcium??? bone meal is a good source, sea shells, oyster shells......
     
  3. Keegan

    Keegan LawnSite Senior Member
    from CT
    Posts: 605

    I was actually looking to raise the PH on one property. It's 4.1
     
  4. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,116

    Compost, a good to great source of compost

    the soil may be 4.1 but the rhyzoplane is where it counts.
    Get more good inputs in there and you will be fine

    don't chase PH, think long term
     
  5. growingdeeprootsorganicly

    growingdeeprootsorganicly LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 766

    im guilty.... i chase the ph ghost.... to many yards have poor soils out there

    proper soil ph is very important on many levels to a particular plant.
    if ph is that low for turf? and mass quantity's of quality compost are not an option...or time?

    then do whats need to correct ph.....

    ive never used the asked about product but hear it has 3x the efficiency and power as regular high cal lime......also cost more
     
  6. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,116

    short term you can put stuff down and get a great results. $15 for a soil test, cool the soil test is the best

    Long term, don't chase PH, the plant root could care less what your random digs in the dirt are, it is about the microorganisms that are there, they determine the PH next to the root, the Rhizoplane

    You have been duped by the fertilzer companies again and again and again and again

    really ..........think about it
     
  7. growingdeeprootsorganicly

    growingdeeprootsorganicly LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 766



    i disagree with your statement.. i use a ph meter in the field daily. when ph is way off in soil. water, fert solution...... growth slows
     
  8. green_mark

    green_mark LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 494

    Our experience has been to test on site with a kelway meter. If the soil is moist you will get an accurate reading.

    We have 1,000 of lawns in Mpls/St Paul area that have very thin turf, Creeping Charlie and many other weeds.

    The lower the pH reading the more weeds and the thinner the turf.

    We apply straight up lime at 25 - 50 lbs/1,000 [depending on how bad it is] and your 4 pH is bad. This provides very strong responses within 30 days.

    Often we will Core Aerate, Lime, Alfalfa and Over Seed to get the process off to a good start.

    Each year on a property as bad as the one you described we will apply at least 25 lbs /1,000 after the initial boost of 50 lbs/1,000.

    Customers are very happy with the program.
     
  9. growingdeeprootsorganicly

    growingdeeprootsorganicly LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 766


    yah.....i thinking about it.......your a fertilizer sales man? right bill?

    your a monday morning quarter back with advice STRAIGHT off the Internet
    get a grip!

    do you ever make a commit that doesn't some how relate to your product???? the under line theme you always have?

    why don't you go post on yahoo some more with your THEME POSTS to just get your company/product name out there SOME MORE

    durrrrr!!!!:dizzy:
     
  10. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    Go brew a tea at pH 4 and tell me the microbes don't have a pH range...

    Be sure to verify that the pH 4 brew breeds out the same microbes as a neutral pH brew...

    Show me that the microbes take a pH 4 brew to pH of 7 during brew times... (albeit they might actually help because they produce CO2 which equates to CO2 + H2O = H + HCO3)

    The claims are that these microbes do this amazing pH balancing thing aren't they? Show me? When I brought up the idea that they could I got knocked for it...

    PS, if you study nutrients in the soil you learn that the Rhizoplane is NOT the only place where plant required minerals exist... study soil diffusion? Maybe mass flow? A few good articles were linked in the nitrogen thread...
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2008

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