Some More Drainage Help

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by GravelyGuy, Jul 23, 2009.

  1. GravelyGuy

    GravelyGuy LawnSite Silver Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 2,517

    Thanks for those that helped me out with the last drainage job I had going, it turned out well. I have another job here, actually several more, but we'll start slow here.

    You can see in the pictures where the water comes out of the downspout and collects by the grill. I was thinking I could simply run a piece of tubing off of the down spout 10-15' away from the spot and make some kind of dry well. I've never done a dry well before so let me know what you think.

    Cutshall & Drainage 008.jpg

    Cutshall & Drainage 010.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2009
  2. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    Check out NDS products, especially the Flo-Well. A catch basin at the bottom of the downspout, with some 4" PVC pipe to a properly installed Flo-Well will make that area usable again. You do have to perform some soil analysis and calculations, but the NDS Pro website will guide you.

    http://ndspro.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=frontpage&Itemid=17

    If you can, it is always best to run the downspout tubing to open air if you can get the right pitch and have a place for the pipe to empty, that won't cause another problem.The use of a Pop-up emitter will make the outlet a cleaner, less obtrusive option. I like to add a few feet of perforated pipe, a sock and some drainage rock leading up to the Pop-up. This method allows a majority of the outflow to percolate right into the ground and has prevented any Pop-ups from freezing or malfunctioning.

    Kirk
     
  3. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776

    What is the grade like on the other side of the fence (behind the grill)
     
  4. GravelyGuy

    GravelyGuy LawnSite Silver Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 2,517


    Are you saying that you think my best option would be to avoid the dry well and just run the pipe underground to the low area at the back of the property? This would be much easier. The soil in this neighborhood has a ton of clay in it so I would have to make a large dry well because it is going to drain slowly.

    I helped another customer a few doors down put up a flag pole and I had to dig a 2-3' hole and the it didn't drain well at all.

    The grade on the other side of the fence is acceptable. Water doesn't really accumulate there and there is no basement.

    Thanks for the help.
     
  5. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    Open air is always best. Allow it to percolate back into the soil naturally. A drywell will need maintenance in time, but sometimes it is the best solution. If a permeable layer of soil can be reached with reasonable digging, a drywell is an excellent alternative.

    Looks like the area in the back was, or is a drainage swale. If it is still active, take advantage of it and the water should move away. If it has been disrupted, as is so often the case in suburban areas,you will need an alternative. A raingarden can be a worthwhile addition to most landscapes and can be created quite easily. A dry creek made is only attractive and successful if it is maintained.

    Kirk


    Kirk
     
  6. GravelyGuy

    GravelyGuy LawnSite Silver Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 2,517

    Kirk,

    Can you give me some details? Should I just bury non perforated pipe, or should I use perforated pipe with a sock in a bed of gravel?

    Any suggestion on how prevent erosion where the pipe exits? Simple splashblock maybe?
     
  7. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776

    Can you divert the water with a pop-up and go underneath the fence with it.
     
  8. GravelyGuy

    GravelyGuy LawnSite Silver Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 2,517

    Under the fence would be directly into the neighbors yard or into the front yard. I think using the existing low area at the back would probably be best, but I'm open to ideas. I'm new to this kind of stuff.
     
  9. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776

    I just wasn't sure if you had a good slope going to the front yard to take advantage of the grade.

    Ya, definitively can't drain into the neighbors yard, but if you could go out front with it, then go for it.

    Otherwise you'll have to take advantage of the low spot in the back.
     
  10. GravelyGuy

    GravelyGuy LawnSite Silver Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 2,517

    Should I use perforated pipe in a bed of gravel that dumps out onto a splash block, or just use a regular piece of nonperforated tubing buried underground?

    Simple=better for me here.
     

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