Some Questions ?

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by Lawn Dog2001, Jun 3, 2001.

  1. Lawn Dog2001

    Lawn Dog2001 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,027

    I just recently passes both my core and lawn & turf exams, and aquired my BU# and insurance. I dont plan on building my route up untill the beginning of next year. But I could use some feedback before then, as I am now in the planning stage.

    First of all. Have any of you ever gotten sick from your extended use of pesticides(especially organophosphates)? If so was it do to your own carelessness or was it something that could not be prevented? I just would like to know because, after reading the textbooks I became a little worried about the risks involved.

    Second. I plan on marketing the fertilization part of my company heavily at the begining of next year. I would like to offer somewhat of a generalized package to start with. I have already developed a program I feel comfortable with but I am curious as to what you guys would charge customers who are willing to pre pay for say a 5 step program. Lets just say approx. 10000sqft. Would you give a discount for pre pay?

    Lastly. If any of you have advice for me on any other aspect of fertilization I would appreciate it. I presently have 150 lawn cutting accounts and 50 of those have already given me a verbal commitment that I will take over theyre fert. next year. I want to make sure I am well prepared to service them properly.
     
  2. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,555

    Ive never gotten sick,at least as far as i know.When I took the test,the instrcutors were fairly honest,they told us they really didnt know what the long term effects were,and that was why all the safety equipment was required.I have one friend who has been spraying since the early 70's.He is develping prostate trouble now.From what he says prostate cancer,and pesticides are strongly related in men with long term exposure.I have no hard evidence to back any of this up.I would just make sure that you follow the label,get what you're worth,this is no area to cut prices in.Good luck,congrats on getting the license.
     
  3. lawnboykb

    lawnboykb LawnSite Member
    Posts: 51

    To be honest I hate spraying.....even the fertilizers.
    It's gotten to the point if a lawn is sprayed I won't walk on it. The glands in my neck swell up every time I get around the chemicals. One of the girls that works for me got real sick a few weeks back. We thought she got poisoned, pucked all over was weak and so on took her to the ER and all they could tell us was that she must of had a reaction to something.
     
  4. greens1

    greens1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    I use a Tyvec suit, Nitrile gloves and a Wilson resperator with a built in facemask. I have a home made HVLP system, basically a pac-blower with a pressurized misting system.

    I mainly do shrubs and trees but I get a lot of odd looks anyway. To date I have had no ill effects.

    Some of the sprayers in my area use hydrolic and they only wear a mask, the kind that is designed for plaster dust and isulation, and they are spraying Carbaryl.

    Jim L
     
  5. MATTHEW

    MATTHEW LawnSite Senior Member
    from NE OHIO
    Posts: 665

    I HAVE MADE OVER 40,000 APPLICATIONS AND I AM FINE.
    (EXCEPT FOR THE VOICES & THOSE DANG SPIDERS THAT
    KEEEP FOLLOWING ME)JUST KIDDING. FERT IS BASICALLY
    HARMLESS. WEED CONTROL WILL GET ON YOUR SKIN NO
    MATTER WHAT YOU DO. NO PROBLEMS WITH ME. I REMEMBER
    SPRAYING DURSBAN FOR 12 HRS IN THE HOT MAY SUN. BY THE
    END OF THE DAY I WAS SILLY. DOING LOTS OF DYLOX WILL
    MAKE YOUR NOSE RUN. JUST BE SENSIBLE WHEN USING INSECT
    CONTROLS. ONLY USE THEM WHEN THEY ARE NEEDED.IT DOES'NT
    MAKE SENSE TO SPEND MORE AND PUMP THE LAWNS UP WITH IT.
    I USED TO GAT MONTHLY BLOOD TESTS TO TEST CHOLINESTERASE
    LEVELS, AND NEVER WAS NEAR THE LIMIT.
     
  6. MOW ED

    MOW ED LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,028

    Organophosphates can be nasty in an overdose, as a licensed applicator I am well aware of the potential. As a Paramedic I am extra cautious about reading labels and taking the precautions.
    The mnemonic used for this type of overdose is SLUD.
    S alivation
    L acrimation
    U rination
    D efication

    Watering mouth, watering eyes, peein all over yourself and filling the back end of your boxers.

    Atropine is the cure. If you are lucky enough to figure it out and get help.

    I never got sick and I have only seen 1 case of this in a mild form.

    Good Luck
     
  7. Lawn Dog2001

    Lawn Dog2001 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,027

    To Matthew and Mow ED

    Do you think getting regular cholinestine testing is a must. I have been considering seeing my doctor on this, but I have no medical insurance, so all my testings will be out of pocket. I dont mind paying the money if it is a saftey must. But I usally try and avoid the doctor like the plauge.

    Thank you all very much for the replies.
    .
     
  8. jason2

    jason2 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 243

    John,

    Interesting about the relation between prostate cancer and pesticides. My father died of prostate cancer in '98 at the age of 54.

    He was exposed to pesticides for many years. We had a no-till farming operation that replaced mechanical cultivation with chemicals. He started applying chemicals in 1975 with an open cab Melro Spray-Coupe. Later graduated to a big Flexi-Coil sprayer, 100 foot booms and 1000 gallon tank. He pulled this behind an open cab tractor.

    In '97 I insisted he retire the open cab tractor for a JD 4wd with a cab, since I was doing most of the spraying at that time.

    It was common to spend $50,000+ on chemicals a year. So he was exposed to a lot of chemicals. I've always wondered if there was a correlation between his cancer and the chemicals. He was in excellent physical health. Ran 6 miles every morning for twenty years before the cancer.

    In fact I'd even blow out nozzles with my mouth on occasion if the portable air tank was empty. Very intelligent of me! :)
     
  9. lawnboykb

    lawnboykb LawnSite Member
    Posts: 51

    jason2...man you just made me think of years ago of the old timers would tell stores of spraying fields and the chemicals going into puddles and the birds landing in them to take a bath....and in the end they would be dead by the next pass with the tractor. And then they would talk like you did about blowing out nozzles with their mouth.
    Nuts I tell ya!!!!
     
  10. Ron Persaud

    Ron Persaud LawnSite Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 17

    A few lessons which I have learnt.
    1. Have the cholinesterase check done early to establish a reference point and annually thereafter to monitor it.
    2. Develop good health habits especially weight control; some of the chemicals are stored in body fat.
    3. Look for an early warning signal which indicates over exposure. In my case my upper lip starts to "tingle" and I will stop spraying.
    4. Use the PPE as specified on the label (at the very least).
    Be extremely careful when handling the concentrate. Regardless of the PPE that I am using, I have got into the habit of holding my breath while I measure out any concentrate.

    The most useful advice that I always try to remember?

    There is no safe chemical; only safe ways of using them.
     

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