Sparkplug Gaps

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by BeautifulBlooms, Nov 30, 2006.

  1. BeautifulBlooms

    BeautifulBlooms LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 613

    I have two pushmowers that I do not have owners manuals for nor do I know what type of service these should receive. I also have a Lesco weedwhip which I have the same question for.

    How do you know what the sparkplug gaps should be? I can pull out the old plugs and check what they were inside the machine, but without havign any books I do not know what the actual should be.

    On normal service do you just change sparkplugs once a year for the heck of it or is the manufacturers change recommendation really important.

    I am new to the mechanical world so please forgive my innocently probably simple questions.
     
  2. dutch1

    dutch1 LawnSite Silver Member
    from Jayhawk
    Posts: 2,231

    .030" is the most common spark plug gap small engines. Without engine ID I can't be definite.

    Dutch
     
  3. BeautifulBlooms

    BeautifulBlooms LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 613

    Also not understanding small engines what happens if the gap is too small or too big? I would assume if it is too big less power or not firing at all, too small maybe too much power?

    I am due for a small engines class soon as I have almost no knowledge of engines.
     
  4. Restrorob

    Restrorob LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,023

    Too small of a gap would lead to less spark to fire the fuel mixture causing popping, Spitting and sputtering (Poor running condition).

    As for learning, Reading the archives (Old Threads) from here and other sites will teach you quite a bit. You could also do a goggle search for small engine repairs.

    You could also start by buying service manuals for the equipment you own.....
     
  5. extremerc76

    extremerc76 LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 93

    for more info on small engines, large engines and just about anything else check out http://www.howstuffworks.com
    search sparkplugs

    the best way to learn how these engines work is to get an old one, garbage picked from an old mower and take it apart, then put it back together and see if it runs. i have rebuilt 4 already for fun.

    if you know how everything works on it, it's alot easier to fix it
     
  6. extremerc76

    extremerc76 LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 93

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